Archive for category: Health & Wellness

Why is Physical Therapy Vital After Hip Replacement?


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

What Are the Benefits of Foam Rolling?

Article featured on Healthline

Foam rolling is a self-myofascial release (SMR) technique. It can help relieve muscle tightness, soreness, and inflammation, and increase your joint range of motion.

Foam rolling can be an effective tool to add to your warm-up or cooldown, before and after exercise. And the benefits of foam rolling may vary from person to person.

Read on to learn the about foam rolling’s benefits and potential risks, plus how to add it to your routine.

1. Ease muscle pain

Foam rolling can be beneficial for easing sore muscles and reducing inflammation.

One small studyTrusted Source of eight male participants found evidence that foam rolling after exercise may help reduce delayed-onset muscle soreness. In the study, physically active men foam rolled for 20 minutes immediately after exercise in addition to 24 and 48 hours after exercising.

These participants saw a decrease in their delayed-onset muscle soreness when compared to exercising without foam rolling. They also performed physical exercises better than those who didn’t foam roll.

More research is needed in a larger, more diverse group of people to confirm how foam rolling affects muscle pain.

2. Increase range of motion

Foam rolling may help increase your range of motion, but more research is needed. Range of motion is important for flexibility and performance.

Researchers found evidence from one small studyTrusted Source of 11 adolescent athletes that a combination of foam rolling and static stretching was most effective for increasing range of motion. This was compared to static stretching or foam rolling alone.

More research is needed among a larger, more diverse group of people to fully understand the connection to foam rolling and range of motion.

For best results from foam rolling, try to stretch out and foam roll after each workout.

3. Temporarily reduce the appearance of cellulite

Providers of some foam rolling products claim the products can help loosen and break up your fascia. Fascia are the body’s connective tissues and contribute to the appearance of cellulite.

While foam rolling may help smooth out your skin temporarily, there is currently no scientific evidence that it can permanently reduce cellulite.

The best way to reduce cellulite is to maintain an active lifestyle and consume a healthy diet.

4. Relieve back pain

SMR may be effectiveTrusted Source for easing pain in the body. It may help ease tension in the back, too.

It’s important to take care when using a foam roller on the back, however. It’s easy to strain or injure your back further.

To use your foam roller for lower back pain, turn your foam roller so it’s vertical (in-line with your spine) and slowly roll the roller from side to side, still in line with your spine. Do this as opposed to keeping it horizontal, which can cause you to arch and strain your back.

You can also try lying on a foam massage ball or a tennis ball to work out knots in the back.

5. Manage fibromyalgia symptoms

SMR has shown promising results for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms.

In one studyTrusted Source of 66 adults living with fibromyalgia, participants who foam rolled for 20 weeks reported that they felt better and had less pain intensity, fatigue, stiffness, and depression than those who didn’t try SMR techniques. They also reported an increase in their range of motion.

While this study is promising, more research is needed to confirm the efficacy of foam rolling for treating fibromyalgia symptoms.

6. Help you to relax

Many people find foam rolling to be relaxing. Breaking up tightness in your muscles may help you feel less tense and calmer as a result. But little evidence exists to show that foam rolling helps with relaxation.

In one small studyTrusted Source, 20 female participants either foam rolled or rested for 30 minutes after walking on the treadmill. Researchers didn’t find that foam rolling significantly reduced stress levels more than resting.

More research is needed. In the meantime, if you find foam rolling to be relaxing, there’s no harm in adding it to your weekly routine.

Is foam rolling safe?

Foam rolling is generally considered safe to do if you experience muscle tightness or regularly exercise. But avoid foam rolling if you have a serious injury such as a muscle tear or break, unless your doctor or a physical therapist has cleared you first.

Also avoid rolling over small joints like your knees, elbows, and ankles, which could cause you to hyperextend or damage them. Instead, when foam rolling your legs, roll out your calves first and then your quads separately, avoiding the knee area.

Foam rolling may help relieve tension during pregnancy. Just get cleared by your doctor first and avoid lying on your back to foam roll later in your pregnancy. You also should skip rolling out the calves in your third trimester. This may cause premature labor. Talk to your doctor if you are concerned.

How to choose a foam roller

A foam roller is usually cylinder-shaped and made of dense foam. But you can find foam rollers in a range of sizes and shapes, and in various levels of firmness.

It may take some trial and error to find the foam roller that’s right for you. Try out different foam rollers before purchasing to find one that is comfortable for you to use.

Here are some of the different types of foam rollers available online:

  • Smooth rollers are known for having a smooth, dense foam surface. They are best for people new to foam rolling. They offer even texture and aren’t as intense as a textured roller. This option is less expensive, too.
  • Textured rollers have ridges and knobs on them. They are used to work deeper into muscles, and work out knots and tension.
  • Foam-covered massage sticks can be used to deeply massage your legs or upper back.
  • Foam massage balls can be used for targeted muscle areas. For example, to work out knots in shoulders.

When choosing a foam roller, you’ll also want to take the shape and size into consideration. A shorter roller is more effective for smaller areas like the arms and calves, for example. Shorter rollers are also are more portable if you plan to travel with your roller.

How to start foam rolling

If you’ve never foam rolled before, you may want to learn a few basics before you get started. You can find endless “foam rolling for beginners” videos online that will explain how to safely roll out different parts of the body.

Or if you exercise at a gym with foam rollers, you can also ask a trainer to walk you through how to use one. You can also try foam rolling classes to learn how to use it effectively.

In general, follow these tips to get started:

  • Start with light pressure and build up as you get used to foam rolling. You may find it painful to foam roll at first if your muscles are tight. To adjust pressure, reduce the amount of body weight you’re putting onto the roller. For example, if you’re rolling out your calf, use your arms to help support your body and take some of your body weight off of the roller.
  • Slowly roll tender areas for 10 seconds to start, then work up to 30 to 60 seconds at a time.
  • Drink plenty of water after foam rolling to help with recovery.

If you want more tips, here are 8 foam rolling moves you can try.

Takeaway

Foam rolling can be an effective way to reduce muscle tension before starting your workout. That’s especially the case if you have any leftover tension from exercising over the previous few days.

Foam rolling can also be an important tool to use while cooling down after exercise.

If you add a foam roller to your warm-up and cooldown routine, you may find yourself feeling less sore in the days following.

If you regularly sit or stand for your job, or just have aches and pains, foam rolling can also be useful.

Always talk to your doctor before adding any new tools to your daily routine.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

What to Know About Forearm Muscles

Article featured on WebMD

Many muscles make up the forearm, extending from your elbow joint to your hand. The ulna and radius bones form a rotational joint that allows your forearm to turn the palm of your hand either up or down. Two large arteries, also known as the ulna and radius, run the length of the forearm and branch into smaller arteries that service your forearm’s musculature.

The bones in your forearm are prone to being broken because people often instinctually extend their forearm trying to break a fall or protect their face, which could lead to a fracture. The muscles in your forearm that allow you to bring about different movements can be categorized as anterior and posterior.

These are the muscles that can be found in your forearm:

The Anterior Compartment 

The anterior superficial layer contains four muscles that originate from the medial epicondyle. The pronator teres muscle attaches to the shaft of the radius and is the most medial of the muscles in this layer. Its primary action is the pronation of the forearm. The flexor carpi radialis contributes to abduction and attaches to the base of metacarpals II and III.

Connecting to the flexor retinaculum and acting to flex at the wrist, the palmaris longus allows you to wave at a friend or say goodbye to a loved one. About 15% of the population does not have this muscle, though.

The flexor carpi ulnar is the most lateral of the muscles in the superficial layer, responsible for flexion and abduction at the wrist. It attaches the hand to the pisiform bone and base of the 5th metacarpal. This muscle allows you to move your wrist back and forth.

The Intermediate Layer 

Only one muscle makes up the intermediate layer, which originates from the medial condyle of the humerus and the radius. The flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) lies between the deep and superficial muscle layers and splits into four tendons that attach to the middle phalanx of a finger. At the proximal interphalangeal joints (PIPJs) and the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPJs), the FDS flexes the fingers and contributes to wrist flexion.

The Deep Layer 

The flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) splits into four tendons and originates at the ulna. This muscle attaches to the distal phalanx of each finger and allows flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joints and distal interphalangeal joints. Bending your ring, middle, index, and pinkie fingers is possible because of this muscle. The flexor pollicis longus extends laterally to the flexor digitorum profundus muscle.

This muscle attaches to the distal phalanx of the thumb and originates from the radius. It stretches laterally to the FDP and allows you to bend your thumb. A square-shaped muscle found in the FDL and FDP, the pronator quadratus attaches to the radius and originates from the ulna. The pronator quadratus allows you to pronate your forearm and is innervated by the median nerve.

Posterior Compartment 

The radial nerve innervates all the muscles in this compartment; it contains more muscles than the anterior compartment and can be split into the superficial and deep layers. Eight muscles are in the superficial layer, and five are in the deep compartment. Four of the five muscles in the deep layer act on your thumb and index finger.
The Superficial Layer The brachioradialis muscle attaches to the distal radius and originates from the lateral humerus. It allows you to flex your elbow and lift a glass of water to your mouth. Contributing to wrist abduction, the extensor carpi radialis longus muscle acts to extend the wrist. It attaches to the metacarpal III and originates from the lateral aspect of the humerus. The extensor digitorum splits into four tendons and connects to the distal phalanx of each of your fingers. Originating from the lateral epicondyle of the humerus, this muscle acts to extend your fingers at the PIJs and MCPJs.The extensor digiti minimi originates from the lateral epicondyle of the humerus and acts to extend the little finger. The extensor carpi ulnaris attaches to metacarpal V and originates from the lateral epicondyle of the humerus. It contributes to wrist abduction and acts to extend at the wrist. The anconeus is situated superior to the other muscles in the superficial layer. The anconeus attaches to the olecranon and originates from the lateral epicondyle. It acts to extend at your elbow joint.

The Deep Layer

The supinator muscle can be found in the deep layer and originates from the lateral epicondylitis of the humerus and the ulna. The deep radial nerve innervates this muscle.

The extensor pollicis brevis allows you to make a thumbs-up signal. It attaches to the proximal phalanx of the thumb and originates from the posterior radius. Your extensor pollicis longus muscle acts to extend the thumb and is attached to the distal phalanx of the thumb. The extensor indicis attaches to the distal phalanx of your index finger and also acts to extend it; this muscle originates from the interosseous membrane and the ulna.

Your abductor pollicis longus muscle attaches to metacarpal I and abducts the thumb. It sits between the radius and ulna and originates from the interosseous membrane.

From taking a heavy box up a flight of stairs to playing basketball, your forearm muscles are used in your daily life, and strengthening these muscles can also help increase your grip strength. A firm grip can help you in many ways in your everyday life.

Here are some exercises you can try to strengthen your arm muscles:

Find weighted objects like tires to carry and walk for as long as possible. Set it down and then pick it back up. Repeat this until you get tired. If you have access to a sturdy bar, try pull-ups or chin-ups. Other activities like gardening are an excellent way to keep your body in motion and strengthen your arms and hands. Pulling weeds and hammering nails can also help you achieve stronger forearms.

If you go to the gym, grab a couple of dumbbells, and hold them out in front of you until you are exhausted. Finger curls, dumbbell reverse curls, barbell reverse bicep curls, dumbbell wrist extensions, and hammer curls are great exercises you can try to strengthen your forearms.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Are Rest Days Important for Exercise?

Article featured on Healthline

We’re always told to stay active and get regular exercise. But whether you’re training for a competition or feeling extra motivated, more isn’t always better.

Rest days are just as important as exercise. A successful fitness regimen isn’t complete without rest days.

Taking regular breaks allows your body to recover and repair. It’s a critical part of progress, regardless of your fitness level or sport. Otherwise, skipping rest days can lead to overtraining or burnout.

Plus, your muscles need glycogen to function, even when you’re not working out. By getting adequate rest, you’ll prevent fatigue by letting your glycogen stores refill.

3. Reduces risk of injury

Regular rest is essential for staying safe during exercise. When your body is overworked, you’ll be more likely to fall out of form, drop a weight, or take a wrong step.

Overtraining also exposes your muscles to repetitive stress and strain. This increases the risk of overuse injuries, forcing you to take more rest days than planned.

4. Improves performance

When you don’t get enough rest, it can be hard to do your normal routine, let alone challenge yourself. For example, you might be less motivated to do an extra rep or run another mile.

Even if you push yourself, overtraining decreases your performance. You may experience reduced endurance, slow reaction times, and poor agility.

Rest has the opposite effect. It increases energy and prevents fatigue, which prepares your body for consistently successful workouts.

5. Supports healthy sleep

While regular exercise can improve your sleep, taking rest days is also helpful.

Physical activity increases energy-boosting hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. Constant exercise, however, overproduces these hormones. You’ll have a hard time getting quality sleep, which only worsens fatigue and exhaustion.

Rest can help you get better sleep by letting your hormones return to a normal, balanced state.

How to do rest days right 

The ideal rest day looks different for each person. It depends on the intensity and frequency of your normal routine, along with your lifestyle outside of exercise.

However, there are general guidelines for incorporating rest days in various workouts.

Cardio

Typically, rest days aren’t necessary for light cardio. This includes activities like leisurely walking or slow dancing. It’s safe enough to do every day, unless your doctor says otherwise.

But if you’re doing moderate or vigorous aerobic activity, rest days are essential. It’s recommended to take a rest day every three to five days. If you do vigorous cardio, you’ll want to take more frequent rest days.

You can also have an active rest day by doing a light workout, like gentle stretching.

To determine when you should rest, consider the recommendations for aerobic activity. Each week, adults should get 150 to 300 minutes of moderate activity or 75 to 150 minutes of vigorous activity. You can also do a combination of moderate and vigorous activity.

These guidelines can help you plan your rest days. For example, if you’d like to do three days of 50-minute vigorous cardio sessions, you can plan rest days and other workouts around them.

Running

While running is a form of cardio, it usually requires a different approach to rest days.

If you’re a beginner, start running three days a week. Running too much too soon can lead to fatigue and overuse injuries.

On the other days, let yourself rest or do different activities. Your other workouts should involve muscles you don’t use while running.

Rest days are even more important if you’re training for a marathon. In the last three weeks before the event, it’s best to rest more often. A personal trainer or running coach can explain how to rest based on your goals.

Bodybuilding

Bodybuilding, or weight training, incorporates rest days by rotating the muscles worked.

After exercising a specific muscle group, let it rest for one to two days. This gives your muscles a chance to repair and heal.

On the other days, train different muscles. Be sure to work opposing muscles to keep your body balanced.

One way to do rest days is to assign a day for each body part. For instance, Monday can be leg day, Tuesday can be chest day, and so on.

For weight loss

If you’re trying to lose weight, you should still have regular rest days.

Rest allows your muscles to rebuild and grow. And when you have more muscle, you’ll burn more calories at rest. That’s because muscle burns more energy than fat.

Additionally, when you feel refreshed, you’ll be more likely to stick to your exercise routine.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

How Can I Prevent Common Exercise Injuries?


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Injuries in Autumn to Watch Out For

Article featured on Central Orthopedic Group

Autumn- a time for family, a time for activities!

The air has finally cooled and the Long Island humidity is slowly dissipating. It’s almost time for warm cider as we sit around firepits and revel in the crisp evening air. In old times, the harvest would be upon us. Although most of us aren’t spending our days plucking the bounty in the fields, Autumn brings about an increase in physical activity for many of us, sometimes we don’t even realize it!

Autumn Activities

Pumpkin farms, gardening, baking, and raking leaves. These joy bringing activities, unfortunately, can be injuries waiting to happen.

Lifting, Bending & Running Injuries

1) Strains

A strain occurs to muscles and tendons. It is commonly known as a pulled muscle. Tendons are connective tissues that attach muscle to bone. The exertion placed on a specific area can cause microscopic tears in the tissue. Subsequently, strains can be very painful. Bending, lifting, and jerking motions without the use of proper body mechanics can cause strains. Raking leaves and picking up heavy pumpkins or gourds are all common causes of strains. Pain or tenderness, weakness, redness, swelling, or muscle spasms may all be indicative of a strain.

There are many different orthopedic methods for treating strains- both surgical and nonsurgical. Rest is imperative, cold therapy and light stretching may help as well. An increase in blood flow will aid the injured tissue in healing. For this reason, gentle movement will help.

2) Sprains

Sprains, on the other hand, are tearing or stretching of ligaments. Ligaments are fibrous pieces of connective tissue that connect two bones together. When overstretching or overexerting happens, sprains occur. Similar to strains, signs, and symptoms of sprains include redness, swelling, pain, and decreased mobility. On the other hand bruising may also occur. Oftentimes clients report hearing a popping sound when the injury occurs. Gardening is a leading cause of sprains. It is important to make sure your space is uncluttered and it is clear when you get up from kneeling. A trip over a plant can cause a fall which can lead to trauma on the joint causing a Sprain.

Treatment of sprains may be as simple as casting or splinting the affected area. Surgery may be required though. Noninvasive treatment of sprains is common. Therefore, rest, ice, compression to treat swelling and elevation can alleviate pain experienced with sprains.

3) Stress Fractures

You may find yourself out walking or running more often because the weather has cooled. Overuse is one of the most common causes of running injuries. Stress fractures can occur with repeated and continuous stress on the bones. High impact activity like running on hard surfaces causes repetitive blows to the bones of the foot, ankle, and leg. So, the connective tissues in the body become fatigued. They are unable to aid in absorbing shock the way they need to. Symptoms of stress fractures include pain upon use that subsides with rest and swelling or aching at the injury site.

An x-ray assesses and diagnosis the injury. A comprehensive treatment plan will then be created. A brace or splint may be required and rest is always recommended. As a result, avoidance of weight-bearing activity may also be necessary. Surgical intervention may be warranted in severe cases where the fracture persists or worsens. Orthopedic surgical care may include screws, pins, or plates to aid in the healing of the fracture.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

People Who Exercise in Groups Get More Health Benefits

Article featured on Healthline

Any kind of exercise is good for you, but working out in groups may give you a little extra boost.

Do you like to hit the gym, road, or trail by yourself?

Or do you thrive in a crowded group fitness class with everyone breathing, moving, and toning in sync?

No matter what kind of exercise you gravitate toward, there’s no downside to staying physically active — especially with so many Americans falling shortTrusted Source of national exercise guidelines.

But research suggests that if you’re a loner when it comes to exercise, you might be missing out on some health benefits from group workouts.

Group versus solo workouts

Exercise is already known to have many benefits for mental healthTrusted Source, including improving sleep and mood, boosting sex drive, and increasing energy levels and mental alertness.

In a new study, researchers looked at whether group exercise could help medical students, a high-stress group that could probably use regular workouts.

For the research, 69 medical students joined one of three exercise groups.

One group did a 30-minute group core strengthening and functional fitness training program at least once a week, along with extra exercise if they wanted.

Another group were solo exercisers, who worked out on their own or with up to two partners at least twice a week.

In the final group, students didn’t do any exercise other than walking or biking to get where they needed to go.

The researchers measured students’ perceived stress levels and quality of life — mental, physical, and emotional — at the start of the study and every four weeks.

All of the students started the study at about the same level for these mental health measures.

After 12 weeks, group exercisers saw improvements in all three types of quality of life, as well as a drop in their stress levels.

In comparison, solo exercisers only improved on mental quality of life — even though they exercised about an hour more each week than the group exercisers.

For the control group, neither stress level nor quality of life changed that much by the end of the study.

The study has some limitations, including its small size and inclusion of only medical students.

Students were also allowed to choose their own exercise group, so there may be physical or personality differences between group and solo exercisers that could affect the results.

So, the results should be viewed with caution. But the research hints at the power of working out together.

The study was published in the November issue of The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

Working out in sync

Other research has focused on the impact of group exercise — specifically working out in sync — on social bonding, pain tolerance, and athletic performance.

In a 2013 study in the International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, researchers recruited people to work out for 45 minutes on rowing machines.

After the session, people who had rowed in groups — and synchronized their movements — had a higher pain tolerance compared to solo rowers. Pain tolerance increased whether people were rowing with teammates or with strangers.

Researchers think the increased tolerance to pain may stem from a greater release of endorphins — the “feel good” hormones — due to people getting in sync with one another while exercising.

This kind of coordinated movement is known as behavioral synchrony. It can also occur during other group activities, such as play, religious rituals, and dance.

It may also boost your performance, especially if you’re already close to other people in the group.

In a 2015 studyTrusted Source in PLoS ONE, researchers found that rugby players who coordinated their movements while warming up performed better on a follow-up endurance test.

These athletes were already part of a close-knit rugby team. Researchers think the synchronized movements during the warm-up reinforced the existing social bonds between them.

The researchers write that this “may have changed athlete’s perception of the pain and discomfort associated with fatigue … This allowed participants to push harder and perform better.”

So when you’re surrounded by other cyclists spinning in sync to steady beats, or CXWORXing like it’s a coordinated dance, you may be able to tap into the power of synchrony.

Or not.

Not all group classes created equal

Paul Estabrooks, PhD, a behavioral health professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, found that “exercise context” shapes how much effect exercise has on quality of life, social interactions, physical benefits, and people sticking with their workouts.

In a 2006 review in Sport and Exercise Psychology Review, Estabrooks and his colleagues looked at 44 previous studies that compared the benefits from different exercise contexts.

The contexts included the following: home workouts, either alone or with contact from a health professional; standard exercise classes; and “true group” classes, where special techniques were used to increase social bonding among people in the class.

True group classes provided the most benefits.

Standard exercise classes — without the added bonding — were similar to at-home exercise with help.

Working out alone at home came in last.

In general, the more contact or social support that people had during exercise — from researchers, health professionals, or other exercise participants — the greater the benefits.

Estabrooks told Healthline that “group-based fitness classes are typically only more effective when they use group dynamics strategies.”

This includes setting group goals, sharing feedback, talking with other people in the class, using friendly competition, and incorporating “activities to help people feel like they are part of something — a sense of distinctiveness.”

You may not find this in every exercise class.

“This usually isn’t the case in most group-based fitness classes,” said Estabrooks, “where folks show up, follow an instructor, don’t talk much to one another, and then leave.”

Although group fitness classes may offer extra benefits, not everyone is a spin, body sculpt, or power yoga class kind of person.

One study found that extraverts were more likely to prefer group-based and high-intensity physical activities, compared to introverts.

No big shock there.

I’m an introvert and teach group yoga classes. But I almost never take group classes myself.

I prefer to practice on my own at home. For me, yoga is about solitude and going inward — spoken like a true introvert.

For others, though, yoga could be more about community and social bonding.

In the end, staying active is better for you than being sedentary.

So find some physical activity that you love to do and stick with it — whether it’s packing yourself into a sweaty fitness class or backpacking solo in the wilderness.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
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Understanding Common Orthopedic Injuries Resulting from Car Accidents

Article featured on Coastal Orthopedics
We realize that car accidents can be traumatic experiences that can cause severe, visible, and invisible injuries. Often, the impact can result in orthopedic injuries, which are injuries to the musculoskeletal system that includes bones, joints, muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

These injuries can cause significant pain, limit mobility and the ability to perform everyday tasks and require a lengthy recovery process. Understanding the common orthopedic injuries resulting from car accidents can help you be aware of the potential risks and seek prompt medical attention.

Whiplash

Whiplash is a common injury that results from a car accident, particularly rear-end collisions. It occurs when the neck is jerked back and forth suddenly, causing the head to move beyond its normal range of motion. Whiplash can result in neck pain, stiffness, and limited mobility. It may also cause headaches, fatigue, and dizziness.

The severity of whiplash can vary depending on the force of the impact, the angle of the collision, and other factors. While some people may recover from whiplash within a few weeks with proper rest and pain management, others may experience chronic pain and long-term complications.

Fractures

Fractures, or broken bones, are another common orthopedic injury resulting from car accidents. Fractures can occur in any part of the body, including the arms, legs, hips, spine, and ribs. The severity of the fracture can vary from a hairline fracture to a complete break that requires surgical intervention.

Fractures can cause significant pain, swelling, and limited mobility. In severe cases, fractures can result in permanent disability or chronic pain. Immediate medical attention is essential to prevent further damage and ensure proper healing.

Dislocations

Dislocations occur when a bone is forced out of its normal position in a joint. Car accidents can cause dislocations in various parts of the body, including the shoulder, elbow, hip, and knee. Dislocations can cause significant pain, swelling, and limited mobility. In severe cases, dislocations may require surgery to correct.

Torn Ligaments

Ligaments are tough bands of tissue that connect bones to each other in joints. Car accidents can cause ligaments to tear, resulting in pain, swelling, and instability in the affected joint. Torn ligaments are most common in the knee and ankle, but they can occur in any joint. Recovery from torn ligaments can be lengthy and require physical therapy and rehabilitation.

Spinal Cord Injuries

Spinal cord injuries are a severe orthopedic injury that can result from car accidents. The spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs from the brain to the lower back and controls various bodily functions. Spinal cord injuries can cause partial or complete paralysis, loss of sensation, and other complications.

The severity of a spinal cord injury depends on the location and extent of the damage. Immediate medical attention is crucial to prevent further damage and ensure the best possible outcome.

Soft Tissue Injuries

Soft tissue injuries include injuries to muscles, tendons, and ligaments that are not caused by a fracture or dislocation. Car accidents can cause soft tissue injuries, including sprains and strains. Sprains occur when a ligament is stretched or torn, while strains occur when a muscle or tendon is stretched or torn.

Soft tissue injuries can cause pain, swelling, and limited mobility. While some soft tissue injuries may heal with rest and physical therapy, others may require surgical intervention.

Concussions

Concussions are a type of traumatic brain injury that can occur when the head is hit, shaken, or jerked suddenly. Car accidents can cause concussons, which can result in headaches, dizziness, nausea, and confusion. In severe cases, concussions can cause unconsciousness, seizures, and other complications.

Recovery

Recovery from a concussion can take several weeks or even months, and it is essential to seek prompt medical attention to ensure proper treatment and avoid long-term complications.

Prevention

While car accidents can happen unexpectedly, taking preventive measures can help reduce the risk of orthopedic injuries. Always wear a seatbelt and ensure that all passengers in the car do the same. Properly install and use car seats for children. Avoid driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, and limit distractions while driving, such as using your phone or eating.

Conclusion

Car accidents can cause a range of orthopedic injuries, including whiplash, fractures, dislocations, torn ligaments, spinal cord injuries, soft tissue injuries, and concussions.

These injuries can cause significant pain, limit mobility, and require lengthy recovery periods. Understanding the common orthopedic injuries resulting from car accidents can help you be aware of the potential risks and seek prompt medical attention.

Taking preventive measures, such as wearing a seatbelt and avoiding distractions while driving, can help reduce the risk of orthopedic injuries and ensure your safety on the road.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Gardening, Yard Work and Back Strain

 Article featured on Atlanta Spine Institute

Gardeners, Protect Your Spine!

Digging, weeding, planting, carrying, spading, watering – there’s a lot of potential for back pain in the average flower or vegetable garden. As the Spring and Summer seasons bring in prime gardening weather, how can we protect our spines?

Gardening and Your Back: Preparation

After a long, relatively inactive winter, it’s time to prep your garden beds for the flowers or the vegetables that liven up your meals and brighten up your home. Just as many people use a greenhouse or cold frame to get the jump on spring, the smart gardener can take some steps to make sure that their body is ready for the work ahead. In the months and weeks before you start digging in the dirt, step you exercise routine, add some yoga and gentle stretching and generally tone up. A few sessions a week will improve your general health and disposition, and will likely help you avoid the painful consequences of jumping into the work of gardening before you’re in shape. Before getting down to work, consider taking a brisk walk, and doing some lunges and warmup stretches, so you’re more ready to exert yourself.

Another important prep step: remember to hydrate! Your muscles function better when you combat the effects of sun and exertion by drinking extra water before, during and after working outdoors. Also, when your water intake is sufficient, you might be a little less likely to experience muscle cramps or spasms.

Remember, too, to protect yourself from the sun. A wide brimmed hat and long sleeves might not prevent back spasms, but you’re less likely to incur a painful and potentially dangerous case of sunburn. Sun safety also includes protecting your eyes by wearing sunglasses with UV-blocking lenses.

Gardening and Your Back: Tools

The tools you use can make a significant difference when it comes to protecting your back while gardening. Begin with hand tools: using short-handled tools for digging, weeding and planting can lead you to lean over the work, inviting lower back strain. Using longer handles helps you maintain a more erect posture.

Be careful to rely on your legs and spare your back when lifting bags of soil, mulch or fertilizer. Don’t kneel to garden without a pad – you’re likely to feel stiff and sore afterward, from the knees through the hips to the lumbar region. It’s even better to use a stool, or even a rolling seat, to keep pressure off your knees and stress off your spine. Will you be re-potting plants? Set up a table so you can stand up to do this, instead of leaning over the job. A wheeled tool caddy can help you avoid getting up and down all the time to fetch the implement you put down at the far end of the row.

Gardening and Your Back: Mix up the chores, spread out the work

You might be thinking your garden patch needs a full day of spading and fertilizing, but restrain yourself! For the sake of your back, it’s better to vary your yardwork chores throughout the day. Try breaking up the big tasks with some smaller ones, for the mental AND the physical variety. Remember to take breaks at frequent intervals, to avoid fatigue and overexertion. A little planning can keep you from overdoing your garden tending tasks, and your back will thank you for it.

Gardening and Your Back: Posture

Lifting – remember to use your knees, legs and hips when hefting bags of soil or mulch, or shifting a shovel of dirt. If there’s a lot of material, whether pruned branches, grass clippings or landscaping blocks, move a little bit at a time.

Weeding and harvesting – use that wheeled bench when moving about your garden plot. Leaning over or bending at the waist are much more likely to strain your back muscles than a mindful, back-sparing approach to the job.

Raking – switch hands often when using your leaf rake, hoe or garden cultivator, so you don’t overuse your dominant hand. A more balanced approached to those sweeping and pulling tasks will help keep you pain free for the next day’s chores.

Mowing – if you push a mower or wheeled spreader for seed or fertilizer, be careful not to lean forward too far, as this can inflict strain on your spine. Keep your erect posture in mind as you relax your back and push with your arms and legs.

To sum up: With a little advance planning, a careful selection and use of tools, and a little mindfulness while you work, you can enjoy the best parts of gardening. Here’s to your crop of flowers, vegetables, lush grass, herbs or whatever it is that gives you satisfaction. May you enjoy the fruits of your labor pain-free!


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

What’s to Know About Extensor Tendonitis?

Article featured on MedicalNewsToday

The most common cause is overuse of the muscles, bones, and tendons in the feet or hands.

In the feet, it’s most often caused by:

  • spending a lot of time on the feet
  • wearing shoes that are too tight
  • using inappropriate footwear for a sport or activity

In the hands, the most common cause of extensor tendonitis is doing an activity that uses the hands and wrists in a repetitive motion such as:

  • prolonged or high-impact typing with a non-ergonomic keyboard
  • practicing or playing an instrument, such as piano or guitar, excessively
  • regularly playing sports that stress hands and wrists, including baseball or racquetball

Mallet finger is a common type of injury that occurs to the fingers, especially in athletes. It occurs when the tip of the finger is struck hard, such as with a ball, which injures the tendon that runs along the top of the finger.

Without treatment, the tendon can become permanently damaged, causing the tip of the finger to fail to straighten completely.

Symptoms and diagnosis

The most common symptom of extensor tendonitis, whether it occurs in the foot or the hand, is pain. In the feet, the pain is usually localized to the top of the foot, usually close to the center of the foot. In the hands, pain tends to occur on the top of the hand.

Other symptoms of extensor tendonitis include:

  • redness, warmth or swelling near the injury
  • increased discomfort with activity
  • crepitus, which is a crunchy feeling or sound over the affected tendon
  • stiffness of the joint

Diagnosing extensor tendonitis usually requires a physical exam and history with a physician. The doctor will ask questions about the pain and other symptoms.

Common questions are about whether anything makes the pain better or worse, the history of the symptoms, and if anything triggered the discomfort.

Sometimes, the doctor will order an X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test to get a detailed look at all the bones, muscles and tendons around the injury. These images can help the doctor look at the structures around the pain to see where the damage is and if there is another cause for the symptoms.

Treatment

Injuries to the hands and feet are common and usually resolve within a few days with basic care at home.

However, if the pain doesn’t start to improve after a couple of days, or a person experiences swelling, redness, warmth or other symptoms, they should visit their doctor.

There is a range of treatment options available for extensor tendonitis.

Rest and Relaxation

Resting the affected joint is crucial, especially if the tendonitis is caused by overuse. It is essential to stop the activity that is causing the pain until the tendon has healed, to prevent further injury. In less serious cases, rest may be all that is needed until the tendon has healed.

Finger or toe splints

Mallet finger may require splinting for several weeks so that the tendon returns to its previous position and completely heals in place.

It is important to clarify with the doctor about the length of time that the finger must remain in the splint. It is common to have to wear the splint continuously, even in the shower.

Removing the splint and moving the finger before the tendon has healed, could re-injure the tendon.

Physical therapy

Extensor tendonitis of the foot may require physical therapy and special stretches for a tight calf muscle. Also, some orthopedic surgeons or podiatrists will recommend the use of a splint or orthotic shoe inserts.

Surgery

Surgery to repair extensor tendonitis is rare and usually reserved for very special or unique cases. If considering surgical repair of the extensor tendons, people should ensure they see a surgeon who has experience performing these types of procedures.

Outlook

The prognosis of extensor tendonitis is excellent; in most cases, a person with this condition makes a full recovery without any lasting problems in the affected joints. How long it takes to recover depends on how severe the tendonitis was, and how well a person managed it.

For example, a person who rests properly will recover more quickly than someone who “pushes through” and continues to use the affected joint.

Although it can be painful, extensor tendonitis is a fairly preventable and easily treatable disease. It is important to see the doctor with any pain, especially in the hands or feet.

Quick diagnosis and treatment is the key to minimizing tendon damage and recovery.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm