Archive for category: Back Pain

How Retraining Your Brain Could Help With Lower Back Pain

Article featured on WebMD

Are you among the hundreds of millions of people worldwide with low back pain? If so, you may be familiar with standard treatments like surgery, shots, medications, and spinal manipulations. But new research suggests the solution for the world’s leading cause of disability may lie in fixing how the brain and the body communicate.

Setting out to challenge traditional treatments for chronic back pain, scientists across Australia, Europe, and the U.S. came together to test the effectiveness of altering how neural networks recognize pain for new research.

The randomized clinical trial recruited two groups of 138 participants with chronic low back pain, testing one group with a novel method called graded sensorimotor retraining intervention (RESOLVE) and the other with things like mock laser therapy and noninvasive brain stimulation.

The researchers found the RESOLVE 12-week training course resulted in a statistically significant improvement in pain intensity at 18 weeks.

“What we observed in our trial was a clinically meaningful effect on pain intensity and a clinically meaningful effect on disability. People were happier, they reported their backs felt better, and their quality of life was better,” the study’s lead author, James McAuley, PhD, said in a statement. “This is the first new treatment of its kind for back pain.”

Brainy Talk

Communication between your brain and back changes over time when you have chronic lower back pain, leading the brain to interpret signals from the back differently and change how you move. It is thought that these neural changes make recovery from pain slower and more complicated , according to the Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA), a nonprofit research institute in Sydney, Australia.

“Over time, the back becomes less fit, and the way the back and brain communicate is disrupted in ways that seem to reinforce the notion that the back is vulnerable and needs protecting,” said McAuley, a professor at the University of New South Wales and a NeuRA senior research scientist. “The treatment we devised aims to break this self-sustaining cycle.”

RESOLVE treatment focuses on improving this transformed brain-back communication by slowly retraining the body and the brain without the use of opioids or surgery. People in the study have reported improved quality of life 1 year later, according to McAuley.The researchers said the pain improvement was “modest,” and the method will need to be tested on other patients and conditions. They hope to introduce this new treatment to doctors and physiotherapists within the next 6 to 9 months and have already enlisted partner organizations to start this process, according to NeuRA.

The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Possible Ways to Fall Into Back Pain

Article featured on Atlanta Spine Institute

A chill in the air, sweaters, football, pumpkin spice, and colorful leaves are all signs that fall is here. Cold weather is coming, which means this is your last chance before winter to get those outdoor maintenance tasks done that you’ve been avoiding in the summer heat. Injuries from cleaning are more common than you’d think, and millions of people visit the ER every year for anything from improper lifting to lawnmower accidents. We all want to get our outdoor chores done, but it’s best to avoid them making us sore! Back injuries, muscle strains, injuries from repetitive motion, accidents, and tendonitis all top the list for common fall cleaning injuries. Never underestimate the falls, slips, and trips that can happen in the blink of an eye!

Stay ahead of these injuries with the tips below to help prevent fall injuries happening to you!

Rake Smart

If you’ve ever raked a yard, you know it’s no joke. It can be a full-blown exercise routine, depending on the yard. Take these tips into consideration before you get started this fall!

  1. Warm Up: You don’t exercise without stretching first, so don’t rake either. Stretch for at least ten minutes first.
  2. Size Matters: Make sure you buy a rake that is comfortable for your strength and height. Some rakes come with padded handles to prevent blisters. If they don’t, get some gloves to protect your hands.
  3. See Clear: We know it’s chilly, but keep hats and scarves out of your line of vision. It’s easier to avoid tripping if you can see what’s in front of you on the ground!
  4. Alternate: If you hold the rake the same way the whole time, it will cause strain and soreness in certain muscles. Switch hand and foot position to avoid overusing the same muscles.
  5. Bend Your Knees: When picking up leaves or branches, make sure to bend at your knees. This will help prevent injuring your back.
  6. Resist the Slip: With fall comes rain, which can make for slippery leaves. Wear footwear that is slip-resistant to avoid slipping on wet leaves or grass.
  7. Keep It Light: Too many leaves can be too heavy, especially if they’re wet. Pack your bags light to avoid carrying too much weight to help prevent back strain.

Mow Safe

Maybe you mow the lawn regularly, or maybe it’s your first time. Either way, there are certain precautions anyone should take while operating a lawnmower.

  1. Turn It Off: Of course you need power to mow the lawn, but you need gas to get the power! Before you refuel your mower or perform any maintenance, make sure the engine is off and cool.
  2. Keep Your Extremities Away: Never clear debris from under the mower with your hands or feet; instead, use a broom or sturdy stick. Just keep your hands and feet away from the blades at all times. Even if the engine is off, don’t risk it.
  3. Keep Your Guard Up: Some lawnmowers come with guards, shields, and/or safety devices. Do not remove these! They are there for your protection.
  4. Turn It Off: Oh, was this already mentioned? Never leave your lawn mower unattended while running. Just don’t.
  5. Wear Shoes. Good Shoes.: Don’t mow the lawn barefoot, or in sandals. Tennis shoes are made for physical activity and you could be on your feet for a couple of hours with a push mower. Even on a riding mower, wear tennis shoes. They help protect your feet from debris.
  6. No Drinking: Well, you should drink water, but no alcoholic beverages. It seems like common sense to not be inebriated while operating a machine, but it needs to be said.
  7. Release: Buy a mower that has safety features like handle release. This stops the mower from moving forward if you let go of the handle.
  8. No Children: A young person should be at least 12 years old with supervision and training to operate a lawnmower. They should be 16 to operate a push mower.

Climb Carefully

When falling leaves clog up the gutters, it’s time to bring out the ladder. It’s very easy to get hurt using ladders, so take these tips into consideration the next time you climb one.

  1. Inspect: Any time you use a ladder, make sure you inspect it first. Check for loose screws and hinges, and clean off anything on the ladder like mud or liquids to avoid slipping.
  2. Level: Use a level and firm surface on which to place the ladder. Make sure all four legs are stationed evenly. Soft ground will cause it to move or tilt.
  3. Engage: Before you climb, make sure safety braces and hinges are engaged.
  4. Avoid the Top: Do not stand or sit on the pail shelf of a ladder (it’s the very top). This is not meant to support the weight of a person.
  5. Choose Wisely: If you don’t have the right ladder for the job, don’t do the job until you do. Use a step or utility ladder for low or medium heights and for high heights use an extension ladder.
  6. Get Off: If you get uncomfortable and need to stretch while you’re on a ladder, get off. It’s better to take the extra ten seconds to climb down and reposition. Tilting the ladder even a bit because you are stretching could cause it to tip over.

Remember

Not every tip can be categorized. Here you will find some other tips to remember this fall while working hard.

  1. Stretch Again: It’s best to stretch before any physical activity, but most people don’t remember to stretch again when they’re done. Just a quick ten minutes when you’re done will do your body wonders, and it’s a nice, relaxing cool-down.
  2. Water. Water. Water.: Remember to stay hydrated. Make sure you take breaks for water. If it’s hard for you to remember to take a break, then set an alarm on your phone.
  3. Dress Appropriately: When working outdoors in the fall, it’s good to dress in long sleeves and pants. The thicker the material the better, but it needs to be weather-appropriate also. Sleeves and jeans help protect your skin from bug bites, scratches, and sunburn.
  4. Goggles: If you’re using motorized equipment, remember to wear safety goggles. This protects your eyes from debris and dirt.
  5. Earmuffs: Same as with goggles, especially if the equipment is loud. Protect your hearing.
  6. Mask and Gloves: Chemicals are contained in things like fertilizer and insect poison. Gloves and a mask will help prevent inhalation of toxic chemicals. Also, keep anything with toxic chemicals away from pets and children.

The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Best Exercises for Lower Back Pain Flare-Ups

Article featured on ProTailored

Why Do I Have Low Back Pain?

Low back pain is pain that occurs below the ribs, in the lumbar region of the spine. There are many causes of low back pain. Muscle tightness, injury to the ligaments or discs in the back, or problems with the bones and joints may lead to low back pain. Common causes include improper lifting, poor posture, lack of regular exercise, fracture, ruptured disk, or arthritis. Almost everyone will experience some level of low back pain at some point. Most of the time, your back will start to feel better on its own. However, sometimes the pain will not go away on its own and will require some form of intervention. Physical therapy is a great option to help with low back pain. Our physical therapists can do a full evaluation to determine what may be causing the irritation/inflammation/pain. The treatments will be focused on addressing the cause of the inflammation and helping to decrease pain levels.

Risk Factors for Low Back Pain

Some risk factors of developing low back pain include repetitive movements such as lifting, pulling, or anything that twists the spine. However, sitting at a desk all day can also be hard on your back, especially if your low back is not well supported, or you sit with poor posture.

Prevention of Low Back Pain

Prevention of the low back includes maintaining proper posture while sitting, but also while lifting or pulling. You want to make sure that you bend at the knees and lift with the legs rather than with your back. Exercise and having strong abdominal and back muscles can also help in the prevention of low back pain. If you are prone to low back pain, you may also want to try sleeping on a firm surface, sitting in supportive chairs (that are the correct height), and avoiding high-heeled shoes.

How Can Physical Therapy Help?

Our physical therapists will do a thorough examination to help determine the source of your pain. They will then work towards decreasing the source of the irritation with the use of manual techniques, cupping, scraping, dry needling, and therapeutic exercises. They will also help you determine things to do at home to help you manage and decrease your pain, and work towards preventing future pain.

What Should I Do During Flare-Ups or When I Have a Lot of Pain in the Low Back?

One of the best things that you can do when you have a flare-up or high levels of pain in the low back is to keep the back moving. Your pain levels may be so high that all you want to do is find a comfortable position and not move for a while. However, motion is key in helping alleviate low back pain. But there is a balance here, as you do not want to overdo it and create more pain. Therefore, the best thing to do is work in PAIN-FREE RANGES OF MOTION. That means movements that you can tolerate and that do not increase your pain.

Best Exercises for Flare-Ups of Low Back Pain

Lower Trunk Rotations

  • Start by lying on your back with both knees bent
  • Slowly rock your knees together to one side; hold for a second or two and then rock to the other side
  • If you have sharp pain with this motion, do not go as far!
  • This should feel like a stretch and should not be a sharp pain!
  • Complete slow rotations back and forth 20x

Single Knee to Chest

  • Start by lying on your back with both knees bent
  • Bring one knee up to your chest and hold for 5-10 seconds
  • Repeat on the other side
  • Do this exercise 10x on each side
  • If you have sharp pain with this motion, do not go as far!
  • This should feel like a stretch and should not be a sharp pain!

Pelvic Tilts

  • Start by lying on your back with both knees bent
  • Slowly flatten your back into the table
  • Then slowly rock your pelvis forward so that only your low back lifts off the table
  • Do this exercise back and forth slowly 20x
  • If you have sharp pain with this motion, do not go as far!
  • This should feel like a stretch and should not be a sharp pain!

Piriformis stretch

  • Start by lying on your back with both knees bent
  • Bring one leg up and place your ankle on your opposite knee
  • Use your hand to put pressure on your knee until you feel a stretch
  • Hold this position for 30 seconds and repeat 3x on each side
  • If you have sharp pain with this motion, do not go as far!
  • This should feel like a stretch and should not be a sharp pain!

The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

How to Improve Your Posture at Work

Article featured on Atlanta Spine Institute

How to Improve Your Posture at Work

A majority of Americans spend long periods of time sitting down while at work. Having an improper posture day after day can put those people at risk of chronic back pain, disorders, or future injuries. Read on to learn more about improving your posture at work.

Sitting Disease

The term sitting disease is a relatively new term. It refers to sitting for extended periods of time with little movement and poor posture, which results in multiple long term medical conditions, with chronic back pain being the most common. Even with a healthy level of exercise before or after work, the long periods of sitting can still cause health issues. Sitting disease is most often caused by the following:

  • Long periods without movement which can restrict blood flow to the spine.
  • Workstation or desk setup that causes neck strain, typically a result of monitors that aren’t at eye level.
  • Crossing your legs or ankles for long periods which can cause misalignment of the hips.
  • Slouching over with a rounded back, putting additional stress on your back.

Improving Work Ergonomics to Reduce Neck and Back Pain

Work ergonomics refers to fitting your job to your body and what it needs. For office work, this usually entails adjusting your workstation, desk, computer, chair, and your working habits to better fit your body. Improving work ergonomics generally focuses on keeping your body in a neutral position, not slouching over, and not leaning back too far. Some general tips to improve your work ergonomics include:

  • Rest with your feet flat on the ground and limit the amount of time with your feet or ankles crossed.
  • Keep your back against the back of your chair.
  • Make use of the lumbar support on your chair to help prevent slouching.
  • Adjust your computer monitors so that they’re at eye level, making sure that you’re not always looking down or up on them, which can strain the neck.

Take Breaks

Even with an improved work ergonomics, it is still important to take breaks, stretch, move around, stretch your legs, and promote blood flow. Research has revealed that taking a break about every half hour can significantly reduce the potential for health risks associated with prolonged sitting.

Listen to What Your Body Tells You

Awareness is another key factor in preventing chronic neck and back problems. If your body starts to become sore or stiff, analyze your work ergonomics. Maybe something needs adjusted, or maybe you just need more breaks. Try adjusting and see if the soreness or stiffness improves. If you suffer from chronic neck or back pain, schedule an appointment with your spine specialist to diagnose and recommend treatment to improve your neck and back.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

How to Prevent Back Pain When You’re Traveling

Article featured on HealthPartners

Few things can ruin a vacation faster than a sore neck or back. And unfortunately, back pain from driving – especially long distances – is common. (Plus, back pain and flying often come together, too.)Here are a few key tips I give them to avoid back pain from driving, sitting in a car, flying or sleeping somewhere new.

1. Motion is lotion for your body! Even when traveling, it’s important to stay active to prevent back pain.

  • Use the 30-minute rule.

If you are sitting or standing for 30 minutes, change position. Even if it is only a brief change, it can help prevent back pain. Really, I promise, your back will thank you in the long run.

  • Take regular stretch breaks.

Back pain from driving is common. Stop every 60-90 minutes to get out and walk around while traveling by car, or get out of your plane seat and walk the aisle if permitted.

  • Do simple exercises while seated to help keep your back from getting stiff.

You can do something called a pelvic tilt while sitting on a plane or in the car to mimic the sit-to-stand motion.

2. Stress can contribute to the intensity of low back pain. The better you can manage stress, the better you can prevent back pain and the less you will hurt.

  • Don’t hesitate to ask for help.

Make things easier on yourself and let those who offer to help do so. If the flight attendants will help you lift your bags to the overhead compartment, let them.

  • Plan ahead.

Make a list of everything that needs to get done, and allow extra time to do them all in case things don’t go according to plan. That will make it easier to adjust if something unexpected comes up at the last minute (like, traffic or long security lines). If nothing goes awry, you’ll have extra time to relax!

  • Practice deep breathing and other mindfulness techniques.

I recommend giving progressive muscle relaxation exercises a whirl. They can be a less time-intensive alternative to yoga or meditation. And since they can easily be done in an airplane seat, they can be very helpful in counteracting the issues that can come from back pain and flying.

3. There are certain activities that may lead to back pain from driving or flying. So when you’re traveling, make simple changes to what you’re doing to prevent back pain from flaring up.

  • When you’re spending a long time in a car or plane…

Use a rolled up towel, sweatshirt, lumbar roll or a water bottle to give your back the proper support it needs for a long trip. Place the object just below the small of your back, above your hips.

  • When you’re sleeping in a car or plane…

Use a neck pillow – they really do help. Having a neck pillow will keep your spine in better alignment. And that will decrease the stress that resting in an upright position can put on your neck. If you don’t have a neck pillow, roll up a towel, sweatshirt or small blanket and wrap it around your neck.

  • When you’re standing in lines…

Keep your weight equal between both feet, or shift your weight back and forth. When it comes to the issue of back pain and flying, waiting to go through airport security is often a culprit. You can also try propping a foot up on a bag or curb to decrease the stress to your spine.

  • When you’re lifting luggage or heavy items off the ground…

Use a wide stance with your feet and squat down using your legs. Keep your butt back and put your weight into your heels.

  • When you’re picking small objects off the floor…

Try a technique called the “golfer’s lift.” Kick one leg behind you and bend at the hip like a pendulum, keeping your low back straight. Reach to pick up the object with one arm while using the other to hold a stationary object for support.

  • When you’re sleeping in a different bed…

Use blankets to help cushion a hard mattress if you prefer softer surfaces. If you’re lying on your back, prop up pillows under your knees. Or if you’re lying on your side, put a pillow between your knees. This will help you prevent back pain by keeping your spine in a better position.

 


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Pulled Back Muscle and Lower Back Strain

Article featured on Spine-health

Most episodes of low back pain are caused by damage to the soft tissues supporting the lower spine, including muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

The lower spine, also called the lumbar spine, depends on these soft tissues to help hold the body upright and support weight from the upper body. If put under too much stress, the low back muscles| or soft tissues can become injured and painful.

While a pulled back muscle or strain may seem like a minor injury, the resulting pain and muscle spasms can be surprisingly severe.

Types of Lower Back Strain

There are two common types of soft tissue injuries in the low back:

  • Muscle strain occurs when fibers in a muscle begin to tear from being overstretched or overused (commonly called a pulled muscle).
  • Lumbar sprain occurs when ligaments are overstretched or torn. Ligaments are tough, fibrous tissues that connect bones together.

A specific diagnosis of ligament sprain or muscle strain is usually not needed, as both have almost identical symptoms and receive the same treatment. This article refers mainly to lower back muscle strains, but applies to sprains or other soft tissues injuries as well.

Inflammation and Muscle Spasm

When soft tissues in the low back are stretched or torn, the surrounding area will typically become inflamed.

Inflammation, or local swelling, is part of the body’s natural response to injury, in which blood is rushed to an injured tissue in order to restore it. Inflamed muscles may spasm, feel tender to the touch, or cramp , and contract tightly, causing intense pain.

The Course of Lower Back Muscle Strain

The hip, pelvis, buttock, and hamstring muscles assist low back muscles in supporting the lumbar spine. When these muscles are injured, pain or tightness may be felt across the low back and into the hips or buttocks.

Symptoms are typically limited in duration and follow a pattern:

  • Pain is most intense for the initial few hours and days. It is normal to experience increased pain with certain movements or positions, such as bending forward, backward, or standing upright.
  • Ongoing moderate pain and stiffness is usually felt for 1 to 2 weeks while muscles heal. Pain when holding certain movements (such as anything that jars the spine) or positions (such as standing for a long period), stiffness, and local tenderness are typical.

Compared to many other kinds of back injuries, a pulled muscle is usually straightforward to diagnose and easy to treat, and symptoms usually resolve within 4 to 6 weeks. Some severe muscle injuries, such as a complete muscle tear, can take months to heal.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

7 Lower Back Stretches to Reduce Pain and Build Strength

Article featured on Healthline

Lower back pain is a fairly common health concern, as so many things can cause it.

In some cases, it might be a symptom of an underlying condition, like kidney stones or acute pancreatitis. Other times, it’s simply a side effect of a sedentary lifestyle or repetitive motions.

While stretching isn’t a remedy for all lower back pain, in many instances, it can provide relief. If you’ve been living with some mild discomfort or stiffness, these seven stretches may help reduce the pain and strengthen the muscles in your lower back.

First, a few quick tips

Stretch your lower back with safety and care. Be especially gentle and cautious if you have any type of injury or health concern. It’s best to talk with your doctor first before starting any new types of exercise.

You can do these stretches once or twice a day. But if the pain seems to get worse, or you’re feeling very sore, take a day off from stretching.

Be mindful of your body’s limits and don’t push your body to do too much. Listen to your body and do what feels best for you in each moment.

As you go through these stretches, take your time and pay close attention to your breathing. Use your breath as a guide to make sure you don’t strain or overdo it. You should be able to breathe comfortably and smoothly throughout each pose or stretch.

1. Child’s Pose

This traditional yoga pose gently stretches your gluteus maximus, thigh muscles, and spinal extensors. It helps relieve pain and tension all along your spine, neck, and shoulders.

Its relaxing effect on your body also helps loosen up tight lower back muscles, promoting flexibility and blood circulation along the spine.

To do Child’s Pose, follow these steps:

  1. With your hands and knees on the ground, sink back through your hips to rest them on your heels.
  2. Hinge at your hips as you fold forward, walking your hands out in front of you.
  3. Rest your belly on your thighs.
  4. Extend your arms in front of or alongside your body with your palms facing up.
  5. Focus on breathing deeply and relaxing any areas of tension or tightness.
  6. Hold this pose for up to 1 minute.

You can do this pose several times during your stretching routine. Feel free to do it between each of the other stretches you do.

Modifications

If you feel like you need some extra support, you can place a rolled-up towel on top of or underneath your thighs.

If it’s more comfortable, widen your knees and rest your forehead on a cushion.

2. Knee-to-chest stretch

This stretch relaxes your hips, thighs, and glutes while promoting overall relaxation.

To do a knee-to-chest stretch, follow these steps:

  1. Lie on your back with both knees bent and your feet flat on the floor.
  2. Keep your left knee bent or extend it straight out along the floor.
  3. Draw your right knee into your chest, clasping your hands behind your thigh or at the top of your shinbone.
  4. Lengthen your spine all the way down to your tailbone, and avoid lifting your hips.
  5. Breathe deeply, releasing any tension.
  6. Hold this pose for 30 seconds to 1 minute.
  7. Repeat with the other leg.

Modifications

Place a cushion under your head for extra padding. You can also wrap a towel around your leg if it’s hard for your arms to reach.

To deepen the stretch, tuck your chin into your chest and lift your head up toward your knee.

3. Piriformis stretch

This stretch works your piriformis muscle, which is found deep in your buttocks. Stretching this muscle may help relieve pain and tightness in your buttocks and lower back.

To do a piriformis stretch, follow these steps:

  1. Lie on your back with both knees bent and your feet flat on the floor.
  2. Place your right ankle at the base of your left thigh.
  3. Then, place your hands behind your left thigh and pull up toward your chest until you feel a stretch.
  4. Hold this position for 30 seconds to 1 minute.
  5. Then do the opposite side.

Modifications

To make the stretch more comfortable, keep your bottom foot planted on the floor. Rest your head on a cushion for support.

4. Seated spinal twist

This classic twist stretches your hips, glutes, and back. It increases mobility in your spine and stretches your abdominals, shoulders, and neck. The pressure of this stretch also stimulates your internal organs.

To do a seated spinal twist, follow these steps:

  1. Sit on the floor with both legs extended out in front.
  2. Bend your left knee and place your foot to the outside of your right thigh.
  3. Place your right arm on the outside of your left thigh.
  4. Place your left hand behind you for support.
  5. Starting at the base of your spine, twist to the left side.
  6. Hold this pose for up to 1 minute.
  7. Repeat on the other side.

Modifications

To make this pose more comfortable, keep both legs straight.

For an extra stretch, add in neck rotations during this pose by inhaling to look forward and exhaling to turn your gaze backward. Do 5 to 10 on each side

5. Pelvic tilt

Pelvic tilts build strength in your abdominal muscles, which helps relieve pain and tightness in your lower back. They also have a beneficial effect on your glutes and hamstrings.

To do a pelvic tilt, follow these steps:

  1. Lie on your back with both knees bent and feet flat on the floor.
  2. Engage your abdominal muscles as you flatten your back against the floor.
  3. Breathe normally, holding this position for up to 10 seconds.
  4. Release and take a few deep breaths to relax.
  5. Do 1 to 3 sets of 3 to 5 repetitions.

6. Cat-Cow

Cat-Cow is a great way to wake up your spine while also stretching your shoulders, neck, and chest.

To do Cat-Cow, follow these steps:

  1. Come onto all fours in a tabletop position (hands and knees on the ground).
  2. Press into your hands and feet as you inhale to look up, allowing your belly to fill with air.
  3. Exhale, tucking your chin into your chest and arching your spine toward the ceiling.
  4. Continue this pattern of movement, moving with each breath.
  5. Do this for 1 to 2 minutes.

Modifications

If you have wrist concerns, place your hands slightly forward instead of directly under your shoulders. If you have any knee concerns, place a cushion under them for padding and support.

For deeper holds, simply remain in each position for 5 to 20 seconds at a time instead of moving with each breath.

7. Sphinx stretch

The sphinx stretch is a gentle backbend that allows you to be both active and relaxed. This baby backbend stretches and strengthens your spine, buttocks, and chest.

To do the sphinx stretch, follow these steps:

  1. Lie on your stomach with your elbows underneath your shoulders and your hands extended in front, palms facing down.
  2. Set your feet slightly apart. It’s OK for your big toes to touch.
  3. Gently engage your lower back, buttocks, and thighs as you lift your head and chest.
  4. Stay strong in your lower back and abdominals, breathing deeply.
  5. Press your pelvis into the floor.
  6. Gaze straight ahead or gently close your eyes.
  7. Hold this pose for 30 seconds to 1 minute.

The bottom line

You use your lower back for a lot of things, from walking and running to simply getting out of bed in the morning. Regular stretching is a great way to create and keep flexibility, relieve tension, and help build strength.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Upper Back Pain Between Shoulder Blades: Is it Serious?

Article featured on MedicalNewsToday

Poor posture, injury, or problems with the spine can all lead to upper back pain. A common cause of pain between the shoulder blades is muscle strain. Treatments for mild upper back pain include stretching exercises and pain relievers. Some cases of pain between the shoulder blades are preventable. Someone with underlying spinal problems may need advice from a doctor or physical therapist to reduce pain and discomfort.

Causes

Stretching, maintaining good posture, relieving stress, and avoiding heavy lifting can help alleviate or prevent shoulder pain.

There are several muscles of different shapes and sizes in the upper back, which help with neck, shoulder, and arm movements.

Injuries to these muscles can cause upper back pain. The feeling can be a dull ache or a sharp pain.

Exercise

Some forms of exercise increase the risk of injuring the upper back.

Throwing a ball overhead, lifting weights, and performing some swimming strokes can strain muscles between the shoulder blades. The repetition of these movements over time is a common cause of muscle strain.

Other symptoms of muscle strain include a feeling of weakness in the area, swelling, and muscle cramps. People can treat a mild strain with ice, rest, and pain relievers. Most mild strains should heal within a couple of weeks.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can reduce pain and swelling. It is important to try to avoid activities that strain the back muscles. Applying an ice pack for up to 20 minutes every few hours can also reduce pain and swelling. Gently moving the shoulders at regular intervals can help reduce any stiffness.

Posture

How someone sits or stands can cause pain between the shoulder blades. Some positions that may put a strain on muscles in the upper back include:

  • sitting at a desk for much of the day
  • using an uncomfortable chair
  • leaning over a laptop for long periods
  • crossing the legs when sitting down

These postures can cause a dull ache between the shoulder blades.

Gently stretching the muscles in the upper back can help ease the pain. People can try rolling the shoulders forward and backward to reduce stiffness. Linking the hands behind the back and gently pulling the arms downward might also help.

Stress

Stress causes muscles in the body to become tense. The neck and shoulders are a common area of tension, which can cause pain between the shoulder blades. Stress can also cause headaches if the shoulder muscles are tense for a long time. Addressing the causes of stress, having a good support network, getting enough sleep, and exercising regularly can all reduce stress.

Lifting or carrying

Carrying or lifting something heavy can strain the upper back. People should take care to use safe lifting practices when pushing, pulling, or lifting items.

Carrying a shoulder bag puts weight on the shoulders, pulling on the muscles between the shoulder blades. Holding heavy shopping bags can also strain the arms and the muscles in the upper back.

People can avoid carrying too much weight on the shoulders by choosing backpacks with two straps to spread weight evenly and only carrying essential items. If necessary, a person can make more than one trip to avoid carrying several heavy bags at once.

Muscle injury

Injury to muscles in the upper back can cause pain between the shoulder blades.

Injuries might occur as a result of exercising, lifting something heavy, or falling. A tear can cause severe pain.

The rotator cuff muscles attach the arm to the shoulder blade. Injuring one or more of these muscles can cause pain in the upper back and shoulder. Such injuries can also cause difficulty in moving the arm or shoulder.

Treatment for mild or moderate muscle tears includes resting, applying an ice pack, and doing strengthening exercises. In some cases, a doctor may prescribe steroid injections to reduce swelling. For about 20% of rotator cuff injuries, surgery is necessary to reattach a tendon.

Scoliosis

Scoliosis is a condition in which the spine has a sideways curve. A person’s shoulders or hips may look slightly uneven, or one shoulder might stick out.

Scoliosis does not always cause symptoms, but some people with this condition may experience back pain. Exercise will help strengthen muscles in the upper back and shoulders, which can reduce muscle strain and pain.

Myofascial pain syndrome

Myofascial pain syndrome is a long-term health condition that causes pain in specific muscle groups. Unlike with other chronic pain conditions, pain does not occur throughout the body.

A trigger point in a muscle will cause pain in the area. In the upper back, it may cause pain across the group of muscles around the spine, neck, and shoulders. Treatment can include laser therapy, steroid injections, lifestyle changes, and massage.

Osteoarthritis

Gradual wear and tear of the joints over time can cause osteoarthritis. The symptoms include stiffness, pain, and swelling, which can cause difficulty in moving the joints.

Injuring or overusing the joints can increase the risk of osteoarthritis.

Some people have a job that requires frequent reaching overhead or heavy lifting. This work can lead to osteoarthritis in the shoulder joints and upper back pain later in life.

Maintaining good posture, keeping the muscles in the shoulders and upper back strong, and avoiding heavy lifting can help prevent pain between the shoulder blades.

People who sit at a desk for long periods may benefit from a comfortable chair to prevent upper back pain. They should try to keep the spine in a natural position without hunching the shoulders or pushing the neck forward.

Regular exercise can help a person maintain a moderate weight, which reduces strain on the back. Stress can cause tension in the upper back and shoulders. Yoga or stretching exercises can help ease tight muscles.

Summary

It is easy to strain muscles in the upper back and cause pain between the shoulder blades. Common causes are leaning over a laptop, carrying heavy bags, or sitting in an uncomfortable seat for long periods.

Most causes of upper back pain are mild. However, some more serious problems can cause pain between the shoulder blades. It is important to seek medical advice for symptoms of scoliosis, osteoarthritis, or a muscle tear.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Facts About Degenerative Disc Disease and Sciatica

Article featured on MedicineNet

Sciatica can result from lumbar disc herniation (“ruptured disc”) or spinal osteoarthritis when nerves in the low back are irritated by the abnormal anatomy in the low back.

What is the design of the spine?

The vertebrae are the bony building blocks of the spine. Between each of the largest part of the vertebrae are the discs. Ligaments are situated around the spine and discs. The spine has seven vertebrae in the neck (cervical vertebrae of the cervical spine), 12 vertebrae in the mid-back (thoracic vertebrae of the thoracic spine), and five vertebrae in the low back (lumbar vertebrae of the lumbar spine). In addition, in the mid-buttock beneath the fifth lumbar vertebra are five sacral vertebrae — usually fused as the sacrum bone followed by the tailbone (coccyx).

What is the purpose of the spine and its discs?

The bony spine is designed so that vertebrae “stacked” together can provide a movable support structure. The spine also protects the spinal cord (nervous tissue that extends down the spinal column from the brain) from injury. Each vertebra has a bony arch behind the spinal cord that shields the cord’s nerve tissue. The vertebrae also have a strong bony “body” in front of the spinal cord to provide a platform suitable for weight-bearing.

The spinal discs are pads that serve as cushions between each vertebral body that serve to minimize the impact of movement on the spinal column. Because the discs are situated between vertebrae, they are sometimes referred to as intervertebral discs. Each disc is designed like a jelly donut with a central softer component (nucleus pulposus) surrounded by a firmer ring of tissue (annulus fibrosus). With injury or degeneration, this softer component can sometimes rupture (herniate) through the surrounding outer ring (annulus fibrosus) and irritate adjacent nervous tissue. Ligaments are strong fibrous soft tissues that firmly attach bones to bones. Ligaments attach each of the vertebrae and surround each of the discs. When ligaments are injured as the disc degenerates, localized pain in the area affected can result.

Degenerative Disc Disease Symptom

Low Back Pain

Pain in the low back can be a result of conditions affecting the bony lumbar spine, discs between the vertebrae, ligaments around the spine and discs, spinal cord and nerves, muscles of the low back, internal organs of the pelvis and abdomen, and the skin covering the lumbar area.

What is degenerative disc disease? What causes degenerative disc disease?

As we age, the water and protein content of the cartilage of the body changes. This change results in weaker, more fragile, and thin cartilage. Because both the discs and the joints that stack the vertebrae (facet joints) are partly composed of cartilage, these areas are subject to wear and tear over time (degenerative changes). The gradual deterioration of the disc between the vertebrae is referred to as degenerative disc disease, sometimes abbreviated DDD. Wear of the facet cartilage and the bony changes of the adjacent joint is referred to as degenerative facet joint disease or osteoarthritis of the spine. Trauma injury to the spine can also lead to degenerative disc disease.

Degeneration of the disc space and its contents is medically referred to as spondylosis. Spondylosis can be noted on X-ray tests or MRI scanning of the spine as a narrowing of the normal “disc space” between the adjacent vertebrae.

What are degenerative disc disease symptoms?

Degeneration of the disc tissue makes the disc more susceptible to herniation. Degenerative spondylosis is another name for degeneration of disc tissue. Degeneration of the disc can cause local pain in the affected area. Any level of the spine can be affected by disc degeneration. When disc degeneration affects the spine of the neck, it is referred to as cervical disc disease. When the mid-back is affected, the condition is referred to as thoracic disc disease. Disc degeneration that affects the lumbar spine can cause low back pain (referred to as lumbago) or irritation of a spinal nerve to cause pain radiating down the leg (sciatica). Lumbago causes pain localized to the low back and is common in older people. Degenerative arthritis (osteoarthritis) of the facet joints that can be detected with plain X-ray testing is also a cause of localized lumbar pain. The pain from degenerative disc or joint disease of the spine is usually treated conservatively with intermittent heat, rest, rehabilitative exercises, and medications to relieve pain, muscle spasm, and inflammation.

What are the symptoms of radiculopathy and sciatica?

Radiculopathy refers to nerve irritation caused by damage to the disc between the vertebrae. This occurs because of degeneration (“wear and tear”) of the outer ring of the disc or because of traumatic injury, or both. Weakness of the outer ring leads to disc bulging and disc herniation. As a result, the central softer portion of the disc can rupture through the outer ring of the disc and abut the spinal cord or its nerves as they exit the bony spinal column.

It is important to note that many people have degenerative spines without having any symptoms. When nerves are irritated in the neck from degenerative disc disease, the condition is referred to as cervical radiculopathy. This can lead to painful burning or tingling sensations in the arms. When nerves are irritated in the low back from degenerative disc disease, the condition is called lumbar radiculopathy, and it often causes the commonly recognized “sciatica” pain that shoots down a lower extremity. This condition can be preceded by a localized low-back aching. Sciatica pain can follow a “popping” sensation at onset and be accompanied by numbness and tingling. The pain commonly increases with movements at the waist and can increase with coughing or sneezing. In more severe instances, lumbar radiculopathy can be accompanied by incontinence of the bladder and/or bowels.

How do health care professionals diagnose degenerative disc disease, radiculopathy, and sciatica?

Degenerative disc disease, radiculopathy, and sciatica are suspected when the symptoms described above are noted. The doctor can sometimes detect signs of irritated nerves during the examination. For example, increased radiating pain when the lower extremity is lifted supports the diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Nerve testing (EMG/electromyogram and NCV/nerve conduction velocity) of the lower extremities can be used to detect the nerve irritation. Health care professionals can visualize degenerative spondylosis using plain film X-ray imaging of the spine, CAT, or MRI scanning. The actual disc herniation can be detected with radiology testing, such as CAT or MRI scanning.

What is the treatment for degenerative disc disease, radiculopathy, and sciatica?

The treatment of degenerative disc disease, radiculopathy, and sciatica ranges from nonsurgical (medical) management to surgery. Medical management of radiculopathy includes patient education of the condition, medications to relieve pain (NSAIDs, analgesics) and muscles spasm (muscle relaxants), cortisone injection around the spinal cord (epidural injection), physical therapy (heat, exercises, massage, ultrasound, electrical stimulation), chiropractic manipulation and rest (not strict bed rest, but avoiding reinjury). With unrelenting pain, severe impairment of function, or incontinence (which can indicate spinal cord irritation), surgery may be necessary. The operation performed depends on the overall status of the spine and the age and health of the patient. Procedures include removal of the herniated disc with laminotomy (producing a small hole in the bone of the spine surrounding the spinal cord), laminectomy (removal of the bony wall adjacent to the nerve tissues), by needle technique through the skin (percutaneous discectomy), disc-dissolving procedures (chemonucleolysis), and others.

What is bony encroachment and spinal stenosis?

Any condition that results in movement or growth of the bony vertebrae of the spine can limit the space (encroachment) for the adjacent spinal cord and nerves. Causes of bony encroachment of the spinal nerves include foramen narrowing (narrowing of the portal through which the spinal nerve passes from the spinal column, out of the spinal canal to the body), spondylolisthesis (slipping of one vertebra relative to another), and spinal stenosis (narrowing of the spinal canal causing by compression of the nerve roots or spinal cord by bony spurs or other soft tissues in the spinal canal). For example, lumbar spinal nerve compression in these conditions can lead to sciatica pain that radiates down the lower extremities.

Spinal stenosis (narrowing of the spinal canal) can occur at any level of the spine, but it’s most common in the lumbar spine of the low back. Symptoms depend on the level affected. For example, lumbar spinal stenosis can cause lower-extremity pains that worsen with walking and are relieved by resting (mimicking poor circulation of the lower extremities).

Treatment of these conditions varies (depending on the severity and condition of the patient) from rest to epidural cortisone injection and surgical decompression by removing the bone that is compressing the nervous tissue.

What is the outlook (prognosis) of degenerative disc disease, radiculopathy, and sciatica?

The outlook of degenerative disc disease, radiculopathy, and sciatica depends on the severity of the condition, its precise cause, and the interventions used to treat the patient. When patients respond to conservative treatments, the result can be complete healing. Surgical repairs can require postoperative rehabilitation, including physical therapy.

Is it possible to prevent degenerative disc disease, radiculopathy, and sciatica?

Avoiding injury can prevent degenerative spondylosis and resulting nerve irritation. When the disease already exists, aggravation of existing symptoms can be avoided by limiting stressing or overusing the involved spine.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

3 Signs You Have a Slipped or Bulging Disc

Article features on Spine-Health

When a disc in your lower spine bulges or tears, you may feel pain in your lower back and/or your leg. Here are 3 unique signs of a herniated or protruding disc to help you identify the underlying cause of your lower back problem:

1. Pain while sitting

An activity that exerts tremendous pressure on your lower spinal discs is sitting. If you have a herniated or bulging disc, this increase in pressure within your disc may cause the bulge to become more pronounced, which may aggravate your lower back pain when you sit.

2. Radiating pain into your leg (sciatica)

The discs in your lower back typically herniate or bulge in the posterior (back) and/or lateral (side) region, which is in close proximity to your spinal nerve roots. Herniated discs may affect these nerve roots through one or both of the following 2 methods:

  • Direct compression. When the disc’s bulge or leaking inner contents directly press on a spinal nerve root as it exits the spinal canal.
  • Chemical irritation. When a herniated disc leaks out acidic chemical irritants from the disc material, which may cause inflammation and irritation in the area around the nerve root.

The function of the affected nerve root is then altered, and you may feel a burning pain along with numbness, weakness, and/or tingling along the front and/or back of your thigh, leg, and/or foot. These symptoms are commonly referred to as sciatica. The symptoms and signs of sciatica typically affect one leg at a time.

3. Pain aggravated by specific activities

Your lower back pain and/or sciatica may worsen when you perform certain activities, such as:

  • Bending forward/down
  • Lifting a heavy object
  • Pushing or pulling a heavy object
  • Coughing
  • Sneezing

Lumbar herniated disc pain usually comes on fast. In most cases, there is no single, clear reason for the pain, such as a specific injury or traumatic event. Yet, the pain feels sudden.

This condition can be very painful, but for most people, the symptoms don’t last too long. Nearly 90% of people who experience painful lumbar disc herniation report within 6 weeks that they no longer feel the pain, even if they received no medical treatment for it.

Warning signs and when to see a doctor

Visit your doctor if you exhibit these 3 telltale signs of a herniated disc. Your doctor may recommend a combination of nonsurgical treatments, such as pain-relieving medications and a guided physical therapy program, as well as referral to an interventional pain specialist for image-guided lumbar injections—to help decrease inflammation and relieve the pain.

If you experience any difficulty in controlling your bowel and/or bladder movements, numbness in your inner thigh and genital area, and/or problems in starting urination, consult your doctor immediately. These symptoms and signs may indicate cauda equina syndrome, a serious medical emergency, which is possible with certain severe lower back disc herniations.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm