Back Pain After Pregnancy

Article featured on Spine-Health

Persistent or newly developed pain in the lower back after pregnancy, also known as postpartum back pain, usually lasts for 6 months but may continue up to a decade. Postpartum back pain mostly occurs while performing activities that involve body movements, such as walking, lifting, bending, and/or carrying the new baby, and may be relieved with rest, exercise, and home treatments. The type and severity of pain depend on the underlying cause.

Causes of Postpartum Back Pain

The vast majority of women who experience postpartum back pain develop the symptoms due to pregnancy-related changes in the musculoskeletal system that persist after delivery. In some cases, women may undergo bodily trauma during childbirth that directly involves the lower back and pelvic bones, joints, and/or soft tissues, causing additional pain and discomfort. The type of delivery—vaginal, instrumental, or cesarean section (C-section) may also have a role to play in postpartum back pain.

Loss of muscle tone and joint instability

The effects of pregnancy on the muscles and joints in the lower body vary. A surge in the levels of relaxin, estrogen, and progesterone hormones causes considerable joint relaxation during pregnancy. After delivery, the levels of these hormones decline significantly, causing the joints to return to the pre-pregnant state. It takes an average of 6 to 8 weeks for the joints and surrounding tissues to stabilize and bear weight effectively.

The sudden decrease in hormone levels may cause localized and/or overall effects, such as:

  • A general feeling of tiredness
  • Activity intolerance
  • Pain in the lower back and hip
  • Back pain while walking or performing an exercise

If unsupported posture and body mechanics are used at this time, the risk of further trauma to the lower back and hip are higher.

Diastasis recti

Why Back Pain is Difficult to Treat


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

When Back Pain Is a Spine Compression Fracture

 Article featured on Spine-Health
The type of fracture in the spine that is typically caused by osteoporosis is generally referred to as a compression fracture.

A compression fracture is usually defined as a vertebral bone in the spine that has decreased at least 15 to 20% in height due to fracture.

These compression fractures can occur in vertebrae anywhere in the spine, but they tend to occur most commonly in the upper back (thoracic spine), particularly in the lower vertebrae of that section of the spine (e.g. T10, T11, T12). They rarely occur above the T7 level of the spine. They often occur in the upper lumbar segments as well, such as L1.

Types of Fracture

A spinal fracture due to osteoporosis (weak bones) is commonly referred to as a compression fracture, but can also be called a vertebral fractureosteoporotic fracture, or wedge fracture.

The term “wedge fracture” is used because the fracture usually occurs in the front of the vertebra, collapsing the bone in the front of the spine and leaving the back of the same bone unchanged. This process results in a wedge-shaped vertebra. A wedge compression fracture is generally a mechanically stable fracture pattern.

While wedge fractures are the most common type of compression fracture, there are other types as well, such as:

  • Crush fracture. If the entire bone breaks, rather than just the front of the vertebra, it may be called a crush fracture.
  • Burst fracture. This type of fracture involves some loss of the height in both the front and back walls of the vertebral body (rather than just the front of the vertebra). Making this distinction is important because burst fractures can be unstable and result in progressive deformity or neurologic compromise.

Compression Fracture Symptoms

Vertebral fractures are usually followed by acute back pain, and may lead to chronic pain, deformity (thoracic kyphosis, commonly referred to as a dowager’s hump), loss of height, crowding of internal organs, and loss of muscle and aerobic conditioning due to lack of activity and exercise.

A combination of the above problems from vertebral fractures can also lead to changes in the individual’s self-image, which in turn can adversely affect self-esteem and ability to carry on the activities of daily living.

Because the majority of damage is limited to the front of the vertebral column, the fracture is usually stable and rarely associated with any nerve or spinal cord damage.

Spinal Fractures are Common

Spinal compression fractures that occur as a result of osteoporosis are actually quite common, occurring in approximately 700,000 people in the U.S. each year.

Osteoporosis is especially common in postmenopausal women. In fact, it is estimated that approximately 25% of all postmenopausal women in the United States have had a vertebral compression fracture.

While osteoporosis is far more prevalent in women – approximately four times as many women have low bone mass or osteoporosis as men – it still occurs in men. As many as 25% of men over age 50 will suffer a bone fracture (e.g. hip or spine) due to osteoporosis.

The problem is that the fracture is not always recognized or accurately diagnosed – instead, the patient’s pain is often just thought of as general back pain, such as from a muscle strain or other soft tissue injury, or as a common part of aging. As a result, approximately two thirds of the vertebral fractures that occur each year are not diagnosed and therefore not treated.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Desk Job Dilemma: Preventing and Managing Back Pain at Work

Article featured on Orthapaedic Associates
If you have a desk job, you probably spend a lot of time sitting at your desk, working on your computer. But did you know that this can sometimes lead to back pain? Back pain can be a real nuisance, making it hard to focus on your work and enjoy your day.In this article, we will talk about some simple ways to prevent and manage back pain while you’re at work. These tips are easy to follow and will help you feel better in no time.

Tips for Preventing and Managing Back Pain

Whether you are working from home or in an office, taking steps to prevent and manage back pain is crucial for your comfort and well-being.

Here are some strategies and tips to help you maintain a healthy back while at your desk job:

1.  Ergonomic Workspace

Create an ergonomic workspace by adjusting your chair, keyboard, and monitor to the right height.

Use an ergonomic chair that supports your lower back and encourages proper posture. You can also position your computer monitor at eye level to avoid straining your neck.

2.  Proper Seating

Choose a chair with good lumbar support and adjust it to fit your body’s needs. Sit all the way back in your chair with your back straight and feet flat on the floor.

In addition, avoid crossing your legs for extended periods, as it can lead to poor posture.

3.  Regular Breaks and Stretching

Take short breaks every 30 minutes to stand up, stretch, or walk around briefly.

Incorporate simple stretching exercises into your day to relieve tension in your back, neck, and shoulders. You can try:

  • Gentle neck stretches
  • Shoulder rolls
  • Seated twists

4.  Stay Hydrated

Drink enough water throughout the day to keep your spinal discs lubricated and prevent stiffness.

5.  Use a Lumbar Support Pillow

Consider using a lumbar support pillow to maintain the natural curve of your lower back while sitting.

6.  Mind Your Feet

Ensure your feet are flat on the floor or use a footrest if they do not reach. Avoid crossing your legs for prolonged periods to maintain good posture.

7.  Maintain Regular Exercise

Engage in regular physical activity outside of work hours to strengthen your back muscles and improve overall posture. Activities like swimming, yoga, and walking are excellent choices for back health.

8.  Adjust Your Monitor

Position your computer monitor at eye level to prevent neck and upper back strain. Use monitor stands or adjust your chair’s height if necessary.

9.  Mindful Sitting

Practice mindful sitting by maintaining good posture throughout the day. Always try to:

  • Sit back in your chair
  • Keep your back straight
  • Relax your shoulders
  • Keep your elbows close to your body

In addition, try to avoid slouching or hunching forward.

10.  Take Microbreaks

In addition to regular breaks, incorporate microbreaks every 30 minutes. Stand up, stretch, or take a short walk around your workspace to prevent stiffness and maintain circulation in your back muscles.

By incorporating these strategies and tips into your daily routine, you can significantly reduce the risk of back pain and discomfort while working at your desk job.

Remember that small adjustments can lead to significant improvements in your back health and overall comfort.

When to Consider Seeing an Orthopedic Doctor

While back pain can often be managed with self-care and ergonomic improvements, there are instances when it is essential to consult an orthopedic doctor for professional guidance.

Here are some situations in which you should seriously consider seeking medical advice:

Persistent Pain

If your back pain persists for several weeks despite rest, home remedies, and over-the-counter pain relievers, it may be a sign that an underlying issue may be present.

Severe Pain

Intense and debilitating back pain that affects your daily activities and quality of life should not be ignored.

An orthopedic specialist can help identify the root cause and provide effective treatment options.

Tingling or Numbness

If you experience tingling or numbness in your legs or feet along with back pain, it could indicate nerve compression or other neurological concerns that require evaluation.

Leg Pain and Radiating Symptoms

Pain that radiates down your legs, commonly known as sciatica, can be indicative of herniated discs or spinal stenosis. An orthopedic doctor can diagnose and recommend appropriate treatments.

Difficulty Walking or Balancing

If your back pain makes it challenging to walk or maintain balance, it is a serious concern that should prompt a visit to an orthopedic specialist.

Loss of Bladder or Bowel Control

In rare but critical cases, back pain accompanied by loss of bladder or bowel control may signify a medical emergency. Seek immediate medical attention in such situations.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Signs Your Leg Pain May Require Spine Surgery

Article featured on Arkansas Surgical Hospital

Most people experience pain in their legs at some point in their lives, whether it’s caused by an injury or wear and tear on the muscles and tendons. Usually, the pain goes away as the underlying issue heals or improves over time—but sometimes, spine surgery may be necessary to alleviate the pain in your legs. Here are some signs that you should see a specialist about your leg pain.

Types of Leg Pain Caused by Spine Issues

Common symptoms affecting the leg that are caused by spinal issues include:

  • Pain that radiates down your leg
  • Muscle weakness in your legs
  • Numbness, burning, or tingling sensations down your leg
  • Pain in only one leg
  • A feeling like an electric shock traveling down your leg
  • Difficulty walking

There are many reasons someone may experience these symptoms, so it’s important to see a doctor to determine the cause and if spinal surgery is needed.

Spine Conditions That Cause Leg Pain

Sciatica

If you experience a sharp, shooting pain in your leg that gets worse when you sit or stand, it could be sciatica. A herniated disc can cause this condition in your spine by pressing on the sciatic nerve, which runs from the lower back down to the legs.

In addition to leg pain, you may also have tingling, numbness, or weakness in your leg. It’s important to see a doctor if you experience these symptoms because they can lead to more serious problems.

Spinal Stenosis

One of the most common causes of leg pain is spinal stenosis, which is the narrowing of spaces in your spine. This can put pressure on your nerves and cause pain, numbness, or weakness in your legs.

If you have spinal stenosis, you may notice that your pain worsens when you stand or walk for long periods. Sitting down or bending forward may help relieve your pain. Serious cases of spinal stenosis may require surgery to widen the space where the nerve is being compressed. While this doesn’t always eliminate pain, it typically makes it more manageable.

Degenerative Disc Disease

Symptoms of degenerative disc disease can include numbness, tingling, and pain that shoots from the lower back down to your legs. If you experience these symptoms, consult a spine specialist for an examination. The specialist will use an x-ray and/or MRI to rule out a spinal fracture or other issues before diagnosing you with degenerative disc disease. Surgery may be needed if the cause is not detected early enough.

Treatment Options for Leg Pain Caused by Spine Issues

A few options are available if you are dealing with leg pain. Depending on the severity of your pain, you may find relief with over-the-counter medication, physical therapy, or steroid injections.

Spine surgery may be an option if your pain is severe and does not respond to these conservative treatments. Before pursuing surgery, talk to your doctor about your treatment options and get a second opinion from a spine specialist.

Surgery for Leg Pain Caused by Spine Issues

There are a few spine surgeries that can be performed. Some of the most common include:

  • Laminectomy, which removes bony growths from the spinal canal to relieve pressure on compressed nerve roots
  • Discectomy, which removes (and sometimes replaces) a herniated disc
  • Vertebral fusion, which stabilizes vertebrae in your spine by fusing them together

Is Your Leg Pain Caused by a Spine Problem?

If you’ve had leg pain for an extended period of time, it’s important to get a proper diagnosis and speak with your doctor about the best treatment options for your condition. Spinal surgery might be necessary if your symptoms worsen quickly without relief or increase in intensity without any known cause.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Good and Bad Exercises for Low Back Pain


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Exercise and Back Pain

Article featured on Spine-Health

Back exercises are almost always necessary to rehabilitate the spine and alleviate back pain. A controlled, gradual exercise program that is tailored to an individual is usually the most effective.

While a typical response to back pain is to take it easy—either staying in bed or at least stopping any strenuous activity—resting for more than a day or two can actually undermine healing and worsen pain.

Benefits of Exercise

When done in a controlled, progressive manner, exercises for relieving back pain have many benefits, including:

  • Strengthening the muscles that support the spine, removing pressure from the spinal discs and facet joints
  • Alleviating stiffness and improving mobility
  • Improving circulation to better distribute nutrients through the body, including to the spinal discs
  • Releasing endorphins, which can naturally relieve pain. A frequent release of endorphins can help reduce reliance on pain medication. Endorphins can also elevate mood and relieve depressive symptoms, a common effect of chronic pain.
  • Minimizing the frequency of back or neck pain episodes, and reducing the severity of pain when it does occur.

A balanced workout should include a combination of stretching and strengthening, as well as aerobic exercise that elevates the heart rate.

Exercise as Prescription for Back Pain

An effective program of back exercises should be comprehensive, working the whole body even as it targets the back. Exercise can be thought of as any other health prescription: A qualified health professional will customize exercise based on a variety of factors. These factors typically include:

  • the clinical diagnosis
  • whether pain is considered mild, moderate, or severe
  • the pain relief necessary to tolerate activity
  • the frequency of prescribed exercises
  • the correct form and healthy posture needed for performing exercises

Maintaining the Exercise Program Over Time

Adherence to exercise is one of the most important factors for long term pain relief. However, maintaining exercise can be difficult for a variety of reasons, including worsened pain with activity, economic constraints, and low motivation. In one study, the most common reason for lack of adherence to exercise was increased pain caused by activity. When this is the case, an exercise professional can incorporate pain reduction and management as primary parts of the exercise program.

Personal preference also plays a role in adherence—for instance, if an exercise routine is too painful or not enjoyable, it is less likely to be done regularly enough to be effective.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Radiating Pain in Your Leg? Best to See Your Doctor

Article featured on Atlanta Spine Institute

Radiating Pain in Your Leg? Best to See Your Doctor

Have you noticed a sharp pain that’s been radiating down your leg? If so, you may be experiencing a herniated disc or damaged nerve. While it may be tempting to treat this type of pain on your own, it is in your best interest to visit your doctor as soon as possible. This is one of those symptoms that can lead to serious complications down the road if you decide to ignore it. Once you do visit a doctor for radiating pain in your leg, here’s what you can expect.

Physical Therapy

In the event the pain medication doesn’t do much, your doctor will recommend physical therapy sessions. These sessions can stretch and strengthen your muscles and eventually relieve your symptoms. You’ll go to a physical therapist on a regular basis and be responsible for performing their prescribed exercises at home.

Injections

If your radiating pain continues for more than a month or two, the next step will be a scan to pinpoint its root cause. You may also be referred to a pain management system. If your scan reveals a herniated disc that leads to a compressed nerve or compressed nerves due to aging your doctor will suggest spinal injections. The injections will deliver cortisone to your spinal column.

Surgery

Surgical intervention will be a last resort and only recommended if conservative measures don’t work. Your doctor will discuss the various surgical options available as well as the risks and anticipated outcomes of each so you can make an informed decision. Understand that you will need to try several conservative treatments before you even consider surgery.

So if you experience radiating leg pain, don’t ignore it. Consult your doctor who will design a treatment plan that is ideal for your unique case. You should also resume your daily activities as stopping them can weaken your spine and make the recovery process far more challenging.

All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Joints That Are Most Commonly Affected by Arthritis

Article featured on Healthgrades

Arthritis is a long-term (chronic) condition that causes joint inflammation. When you’re living with arthritis, a simple task, such as tying your shoe or buttoning your shirt can become a challenging one. Not only does the swelling and aching interfere with work and daily living activities, it can also be painful and sometimes debilitating.

There are more than 100 different types of arthritis, but the most common include rheumatoid arthritis (an autoimmune disease) and osteoarthritis (a “wear-and-tear” condition related to aging, injury or obesity). Both cause joint stiffness, pain and decreased range of motion, and can affect many different joints throughout the body.

1. Knee

The knee is one of the most common joints affected by osteoarthritis. This happens when there’s a breakdown of cartilage, which cushions the ends of the bones where they meet the joints. Symptoms of knee arthritis include stiffness, swelling, and pain, which can make it hard to walk and get in and out of chairs and bed. In severe cases, osteoarthritis in the knees can lead to disability.

2. Hand

When you have arthritis in your hands, it usually includes aching, stiffness or numbness in the fingers or at the base of the thumb joint, making it difficult to pinch or grip items. Small, bony knobs may appear on the middle or end joints (those closest to the fingernails) of the fingers, which can become enlarged and gnarled. This type of arthritis in the hands seems to run in families.

3. Hip

The hip is also a common arthritis site. You may have pain and stiffness in your hip joint, but some people also notice pain in the groin, buttocks, lower back, or front or inner thigh. Or they may have pain in only one of these areas. This type of hip arthritis can affect your ability to move or bend, and make daily activities a challenge.

4. Spine, Neck and Back

Arthritis in the spine usually results in stiffness and pain in the neck or lower back, but in some cases, it may not lead to any pain at all. Arthritis changes can also cause pressure on the nerves where they exit the spinal column, leading to weakness, tingling or numbness of the arms and legs. Since these symptoms can often seem like other health conditions, always check with your doctor for a diagnosis.

5. Foot and Ankle

Arthritis can also cause swelling and pain in the foot and ankle. It most often affects the joint at the base of the big toe, which can make walking difficult. The swelling can also lead to bunions on the toes, which can sometimes make the pain and deformity of the foot worse. With rheumatoid arthritis, the same joints on both sides of the body (such as both feet or both ankles) are usually affected.

6. Elbow

Joint inflammation can also be to blame for elbow pain or loss of function. Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common type of arthritis in the elbow, and if one elbow is affected, the other likely will be, too. While elbow osteoarthritis is more common in weight-bearing joints, such as the knee and hip, it can also occur in the elbow, and is often the result of overuse or an injury, such as in the case of a tennis or baseball player.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

3 Hamstring Stretches to Relieve Lumbar Herniated Disc Pain

Article featured on Atlanta Spine Institute

3 Hamstring Stretches to Relieve Lumbar Herniated Disc Pain

If you suffer from a lumbar herniated disc, you may be experiencing radiating leg pain. The most effective way to relieve radiating leg pain is stretching on a daily basis. These three stretches will help take away some of the pressure on your sciatic nerve in your leg. They’ll also aid in loosening your hamstrings and improve the support in your lumbar spine.

Standing Hamstring Stretch

To perform this stretch, start by standing with your legs straight and feet together. Next, bend at your waist, while keeping your knees straight. Once bent over at the waist, place your hands on your hips or thighs. Inhale, slowly, then exhale, and hold this stretch for 30 seconds. Once the 30 seconds is up, maintain a flat back while you stand up straight.

Seated Hamstring Stretch

This stretch is a better option than the standing stretch if you have limited mobility or if your hamstrings are extremely tight. For this stretch, you’ll need a firm chair with a straight back and another item that has a similar height as the seat of the chair such as a stool or bucket. For this stretch, sit upright on the edge of the chair with both feet flat on the ground.

Straighten one of your legs in front of you and place the back of the heel on the top of the stool. Then, lean forward at the waist towards your straightened leg until you start to feel the stretch near the back side of your thighs. Hold the position for 30 seconds, then switch to stretching your opposite leg.

Towel Hamstring Stretch

This stretch can be performed while lying down and with the aid of a towel. To start, lie on your back on a flat surface. Put your left leg flat on the floor and raise your right leg up in the air. Wrap the towel around the ball of your foot on your right leg, and hold the two ends of the towel, one end in each hand.

Try to push your right heel up towards the ceiling and keep your rig leg straight until you feel it stretching your hamstring. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, and then switch to the other leg. Repeat this stretch 3 times for each leg.

All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm