Torn MCL Average Recovery Time


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Can Surgery Help Your Knee Arthritis?


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Osgood-Schlatter Disease in Children


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

What is a Knee Replacement Revision?

Article featured on Summit Ortho

Hundreds of thousands of Americans have total knee replacement surgery each year to treat severe knee arthritis that no longer responds to conservative treatments. Conservative treatments are those such as medications, physical therapy, or injections. In this surgery, the damaged joint surfaces of the knee are replaced with artificial metal and plastic implants. These knee implants may last individuals 20 or more years. For some people, their knee implants will last the rest of their lives. However, some knee replacements do not last as long as patients and their providers hope or wear out over time.

“I think every knee replacement surgeon hopes that the knee replacement they do for each patient is the last knee surgery for that individual. But sometimes knee replacements wear out over time or may not function as well as we hoped,” said Summit hip and knee surgeon and total joint replacement specialist Brandon Kelly, M.D.

What is a knee replacement revision?

A knee replacement revision is a surgery to replace one or multiple knee replacement parts with new ones. The specifics of each revision surgery depend on how and where the original implant is failing. Other factors include the individual patient’s age, health, activity level, and other factors.

The need for a knee replacement revision surgery is an individualized decision made between the patient and the surgeon. It is typically recommended when there is a problem with the current knee replacement implants or if the knee is not meeting the patient’s quality of life goals. The decision for knee replacement revision is individualized to each patient’s medical and social factors. Sometimes, surgical intervention may not align with every patient’s goals of care.

“Knee replacement revision is usually a big decision for patients and surgeons. I like to educate my patients on what’s going well and what’s not going well with their current knee replacements. Then we discuss what may or may not be improved with revision knee replacement surgery before proceeding with surgery. I like to understand my patients’ goals to ensure I can meet them before proceeding with surgical intervention,” Dr. Kelly noted.

What else is important to know about knee revision surgery?

Revision knee replacement surgery is typically a more complex, longer, and technically challenging surgery than total knee replacement. That’s why it’s important to choose your knee revision specialist carefully. There are many factors that contribute to postoperative recovery, but recovery time after revision knee replacement surgery in most circumstances is similar to a total knee replacement surgery.

As with a first-time knee replacement, preoperative and postoperative physical therapy is vital to help condition and strengthen the lower extremities.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Take Care of Your Knees

Article featured on UCSF Health

Five Steps to Improve Strength and Flexibility

Although collateral ligament injuries often occur during sports and are difficult to avoid, there are several steps you can take to improve the overall strength and flexibility of your knees:

  • Manage your weight: Every pound in excess of your normal weight puts three or four additional pounds of pressure on your knee every time you take a step.
  • Keep your legs strong: The hamstrings, in the back of the thigh, and the quadriceps, the muscles in the front of the thigh, are crucial shock and impact absorbers. These muscles must be kept strong and flexible to protect the joint surfaces in your knee.
  • Stretch your muscles: Stretching before exercising should be a regular part of your warm-up; however, it is important not to over-stretch. Never push or pull on your leg with your hands while you are stretching, and avoid squatting during your warm-up, which can put stress on your knee joint.
  • Wear proper shoes: Well-cushioned, well-fitting athletic shoes can reduce the impact of the load exerted on the knees.
  • Ease into shape: If your activities require twisting and turning such as racket sports, skiing, soccer and basketball, don’t assume you can play yourself into shape. Make sure you are in good physical shape before you play.

The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

4 Things to Know About Meniscus Repair

Article featured on Noyes Knee Institute

Injuries to the meniscus are common, especially among athletes and individuals involved in physical activities. Pain, inflammation, and restricted mobility can result from torn or injured meniscus. Here are four things to know about meniscus repair:

1. The Importance of Early Diagnosis

Early diagnosis of a meniscus tear results in prompt and effective treatment. If left untreated, meniscus tears can worsen over time, leading to more significant pain and potential damage to the knee joint. As soon as symptoms like knee pain, swelling, and limited range of motion arise, consult an orthopedic knee surgeon for a thorough evaluation.

An early diagnosis allows the knee surgeon to recommend appropriate treatment options, including conservative measures like rest, physical therapy, and anti-inflammatory medications. In some cases, meniscus repair surgery may be the best course of action to restore knee function.

2. Meniscus Repair Surgery

Orthopedic knee surgeons perform meniscus repair surgery to mend the torn meniscus tissue and restore knee stability. The surgery can be done through minimally invasive arthroscopic techniques involving small incisions and a tiny camera called an arthroscope that guides the surgeon’s instruments.

During the surgery, the surgeon will carefully suture the torn edges of the meniscus together. This allows the tissue to heal and regain its strength. The success of meniscus repair largely depends on the type and location of the tear, as well as the patient’s age and overall knee health.

3. Rehabilitation and Recovery

Following meniscus repair surgery, a comprehensive rehabilitation program is recommended to promote healing and regain knee function. Orthopedic surgeons work closely with physical therapists to design a personalized rehabilitation plan for each patient.

Rehabilitation typically involves exercises to improve knee strength, flexibility, and stability. Patients are advised to diligently follow their physical therapy regimen and avoid activities that may strain the healing meniscus excessively. The recovery period after meniscus repair surgery varies from patient to patient. While some individuals may resume light activities within a few weeks, others may require several months to recover fully and return to more vigorous activities.

4. Complication Awareness

If the medial meniscus has been destroyed, the only treatment is to remove the damaged portions and repair the remaining area. As with any surgical procedure, meniscus repair surgery carries some risks and potential complications. Infection, blood clots, and adverse reactions to anesthesia are possible but rare. Patients are encouraged to discuss any concerns or medical conditions with their orthopedic knee surgeon before the procedure.

In some cases, meniscus tears may be too severe or located in a region with limited blood supply, making repair surgery unfeasible. The surgeon may opt for a meniscectomy, a procedure to trim and remove the damaged portion of the meniscus. While a meniscectomy provides symptom relief, it may also increase the risk of early-onset osteoarthritis in the knee joint.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

What Are the Red Flags for Knee Pain

Article featured on The Noyes Knee Institute

Knee pain can result from overexertion, injury, or medical conditions like arthritis. This pain hinders daily activities like walking, decreasing your overall productivity. At Noyes Knee Institute, we’ll treat your knee pain to improve your quality of life. Here are some red flags that necessitate seeing an orthopedic knee surgeon:

Sudden Severe Pain

Sudden severe pain with no apparent cause can indicate a serious knee injury. This could include a meniscus tear, torn ligament, fractured bone, or a dislocated kneecap. Seek immediate professional help if the sudden severe pin limits your movement or ability to bear weight on the affected knee.

At Noyes Knee Institute, we have decades of experience helping patients with severe knee pain. We’ll identify the root cause of your pain and create a personalized treatment plan to get you back to your active lifestyle.

Buckling of the Knee

Knee buckling may signal instability in the knee joint or a ligament tear. Ligament tears like anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears can make the knee unstable. This results in a sensation of the knee giving way during weight-bearing activities.

At Noyes Knee Institute, we’ll ask questions about the buckling sensation and order imaging tests to determine if you have a torn ACL. We have a 95% rehabilitation success rate, having conducted over 5,000 ACL reconstruction surgeries. You’ll be in safe hands if you need ACL reconstruction surgery.

Swelling and Warmth

Swelling and warmth around the knee joint can indicate an inflammatory condition like arthritis or an infection. Inflammation can cause the knee joint to become painful and warm to the touch. Sometimes the swelling may be accompanied by a limited range of motion and joint stiffness.

At Noyes Knee Institute, we’ll determine the root cause of the swelling by conducting a physical examination and ordering blood tests. The examination allows us to determine whether your range of motion has been affected. Blood tests will enable us to identify underlying systemic conditions like infections or rheumatoid arthritis.

Knee Locking

Healthy knees are flexible. You should be able to rotate your knees slightly and bend them up and down. Their flexibility allows you to perform daily living activities like standing and sitting. If you can’t, you may be dealing with a locked knee.

Locked knees fall into two categories: true-locked knee and pseudo-locked knee. You can’t move your knee in any direction with a true-locked knee. A pseudo-locked knee occurs when pain in the knee joint is too severe to move the knee. True-locked knees can occur because of limited blood supply to the knees. Pseudo-locked knees can occur because of a tear in the ligament cushioning the knee joint, knee joint dislocation, or fractures.

At Noyes Knee Institute, we’ll conduct imaging tests like MRIs and CT scans to determine whether you have a true or pseudo-locked knee. Our orthopedic knee surgeon, Dr. Noyes, may recommend surgery to remove the obstruction limiting blood supply in the knee joints if our tests determine that you have a true-locked knee. If you have a pseudo-locked knee, we’ll recommend conservative treatments like activity modification and medication.

Persistent Pain

Persistent knee pain that doesn’t improve with rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) or doctor-prescribed conservative treatments like pain medications can signal a serious underlying condition. Seek professional help if your pain progresses over time to find an effective solution.

At Noyes Knee Institute, we’ll conduct a joint aspiration to understand your condition. This involves removing a fluid sample from the knee joint to determine if there’s an infection, inflammation, or other underlying condition before recommending treatment.

Consistent Knee Pain After Surgery

It’s normal for patients to feel knee pain for a few weeks after surgery. The pain should wear off as your knee heals. Your surgery may have failed if you continue experiencing pain, swelling, and bruising around your knee months after surgery. This calls for revision surgery.

At Noyes Knee Institute, we only use grafts from FDA-approved tissue banks for our surgeries and take patients through an active rehabilitation program after their procedures. This, combined with Dr. Noyes’s expertise in orthopedic surgery, improves your chances of having a successful revision surgery.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

What Different Types of Knee Pain Mean

Article featured on Healthgrades

If you’ve ever experienced pain in one or both of your knees, you’re not alone. About one-third of all Americans have felt pain in this major joint at some point in their lives. Women are slightly more likely than men to be affected by it (about 20% of women versus 15 to 20% of men).

Yet the millions of people with this pain don’t all feel the same thing. Knee pain can be sharp or dull, burning or excruciating, accompanied by strange noises or silent. What does your knee pain tell you about what’s wrong?

1. Knee pain with a ‘crunch’

Sometimes knees creak, crack or crunch when you bend them. These sounds—called ‘crepitus’—may be alarming, but don’t necessarily signify a problem, unless your knee hurts at the same time.

If that happens, you could have an injury, such as a torn meniscus (a type of cartilage in your knee) or a dislocated kneecap. The sounds together with pain also could indicate osteoarthritis. Your doctor should check for the source of both your painful sensations and strange sounds.

2. Knee pain when running

If you have a dull pain in and around your kneecap when you run or are doing other activities, you may have ‘runner’s knee,’ also called patellofemoral pain syndrome. Other symptoms include kneecap tenderness, pain when you sit for a long time with your knees bent, and rubbing, grinding or clicking sounds when you bend or straighten your knee.

This syndrome can be caused by running and overuse, as well as structural defects in the knee, shoes that aren’t supportive enough, walking or running with your feet positioned improperly (such as turning in), and injury.

3. Knee pain in the morning

If you wake up with a painful and stiff knee, but find that the aching eases over the course of the day, you may have rheumatoid arthritis. This is an inflammatory disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks joints, such as the knee. Other autoimmune disorders, such as lupus, also can cause similar symptoms.

If you have rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, contact your doctor, especially if you are experiencing pain and stiffness in other joints. Left untreated, rheumatoid arthritis can lead to joint disfigurement.

4. Knee pain when climbing stairs

One of the first signs of osteoarthritis is pain in the knee when going up or down stairs. This pain tends to get worse throughout the day. While osteoarthritis knee pain is usually achy, it can also sometimes be sharp or burning. Other symptoms include swelling, stiffness and feeling like your knee is grinding or may give way.

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition in which protective cartilage at the end of your leg bones wears down. This can ultimately result in bones rubbing against each other, causing pain, swelling, and loss of motion.

5. Knee pain with a pop

One common type of knee injury is a tear to the anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, which connects your thigh bone to your shin and helps keep your knee stable. When the injury happens, you’ll likely hear a loud pop or else feel a popping inside, along with severe pain.

A damaged ACL is likely to leave you with rapid, significant swelling; difficulty fully straightening your leg or bending your knee; and pain when you try to put weight on it. You may feel like the knee is going to give way. In some cases, surgery to repair the ligament may be necessary.

6. Knee pain that’s sudden and severe

If you experience a sudden onset of severe knee pain along with redness, warmth and swelling, especially in the early morning, you might have gout, an arthritic condition that is most commonly seen in the big toe. However, gout also can strike other joints, especially in the leg. Gout can recur and should be treated to help prevent permanent joint damage.

Another reason for sudden severe pain and swelling in a knee is Lyme disease. Children are especially likely to have this symptom of Lyme disease, an infection caused by bacteria from an infected tick. If you suspect Lyme disease, promptly seek care to reduce the risk for complications associated with the disease.

7. Knee pain with bending and kneeling

People in professions that require repetitive kneeling, such as roofers, floor installers, plumbers, coal miners, gardeners and maids, are most at risk for bursitis of the knee. Bursitis refers to inflammation of the bursal sacs of fluid that are around joints.

Repeated bending and kneeling, especially on hard surfaces, can irritate the bursa in the knees, causing gradually worsening symptoms. These symptoms include pain, redness, warmth, swelling, joint stiffness, and sometimes fever, which is a sign of infection. Notify your doctor for a full evaluation and to rule out infection. Bursitis also can be caused by an injury, but this is less common.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Painful Knee Caps: What Causes Them?

Article featured on The Noyes Knee Institute

Pain in the knee caps (patella) is caused by several factors, ranging from old age and overuse to injury and infection. A strenuous activity during the day can cause mild discomfort around the knee, which heals with rest and sleep. Knee cap pain can also be persistent and chronic, calling for the services of an experienced orthopedic knee surgeon. Here’s an overview of the five leading causes of knee cap pain:

1. Knee Overuse

The patella is a knee joint bone structure that suffers wear and tear. Your knee supports walking, jogging, running, jumping, kneeling, and squatting. Straining the knee joint through overuse can result in pain and discomfort around the patella. Knee cap pain resulting from overuse may stop if the strenuous activity is ceased or moderated. Other cases trigger a degenerative process with intermittent and worsening pain.

2. Knee Injury

The knee cap protects the rest of the knee joint structures, including ligaments, cartilages, and muscles. A traumatic blow to the front of the knee area is likely to hurt the patella first, resulting in severe pain. A knee injury can result from falling, participation in sports, a car crash, or other situation strenuous situations. Pain from injury may go away with functional medicine and physical therapy, but occasionally requires knee surgery to repair the damage.

3. Chondromalacia Patellae

Knee cap pain can stem from Chondromalacia, a condition in which the cartilage found behind the patella softens. Normal cartilage is tough and flexible to protect the ends of the joint bones from rubbing on each other. When the cartilage becomes soft, the shinbone and thighbone can move too close to each other or even touch. Chondromalacia weakens cushioning and shock absorption capabilities, resulting in pain around the knee joint, including the patella. With rest and treatment, this condition can heal.

4. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFS)

PFS or runner’s knee is a widespread condition highlighted by pain behind the knee cap area. It develops when the knee joint moves abruptly. PFS also results from knee overuse through running, cycling, climbing, and other strenuous activities. Pain levels vary from mild to severe and are felt around the front of the knee (patella). Runner’s knee is common among athletes and starts as dull recurring pain. This condition is reversible.

5. Muscle Imbalances & Tendonitis

The knee joint relies on the thigh, hip, and knee muscles, which work in tandem to ensure proper movement and support. Injury or imbalance can result in the wrong movements and reflexes, causing pain and inflammation. Conditions like tendonitis inflame the patellar tendons and quadriceps tendons, causing stiffness, tenderness, swelling, and knee pain. Injury, disease, or infection on one of the connected muscles and tendons can cause pain.

Working With a Trusted Orthopedic Knee Surgeon

Knee cap pain can be reversed with rest and sleep, but some conditions are severe and require proper medical attention. Others will need a corrective operation from a licensed orthopedic knee surgeon.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, foot and ankle conditions, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic and podiatric surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:

503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

Common ACL Tear Symptoms & When to Seek Treatment

Article featured on The Noyes Knee Institute

If you experience pain around your knee area, it is advisable to contact an orthopedic knee surgeon as soon as possible. The pain may stem from a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Such situations may call for surgery to prevent further damage to your knee joint.

The ACL is one of four ligaments in your knee. It is located behind the patella (kneecap) and connects the thigh bone to the shin bone. The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial collateral ligament (MCL), and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) are the other three ligaments.

ACL Tear Symptoms

ACL stabilizes the knee when you rotate and can get torn when you make sudden stops or changes in direction. Injuries can also result from high-impact sports and maneuvers such as jumping and landing. A torn ACL has many signs, depending on the severity of the injury. Popular symptoms include:

1. Popping Sounds

A loud popping sound is the most common symptom of a torn anterior cruciate ligament. You will hear the popping sound at the moment of injury. Silent pops may also occur when you try to stand or move the knee joint. ACL tears can also result in a painful grinding feeling of your kneecap and bones.

2. Pain and Swelling

A popping sound may indicate other issues but is often a result of torn ACL, especially when accompanied by pain and swelling. The pain is severe at the moment of injury and becomes sharper when you try to get up or put pressure on the knee. In most cases, the pain is quickly accompanied by inflammation/swelling of the knee area.

3. Inability to Bear Weight

You will barely be able to stand a few minutes after an ACL tear. The anterior cruciate ligament is responsible for stabilizing your knee when you move or change directions. Tears in the band of tissue compromise this function, making it difficult to bear your weight or continue with any activity.

4. Lost Range of Motion

ACL tears can result in loss of range of motion, making it impossible to bend, walk, or sprint. Lost range of motion usually stems from excruciating pain. Your knee surgeon will test the range of motion to determine the severity of your pain and injury. Regaining range of motion is also a good sign during ACL tear recovery.

When to Seek Treatment

The knee is one of the most complex joints and harbors ligaments, tendons, tissues, and bones. It is crucial to seek a medical diagnosis immediately if you experience the symptoms of an ACL tear. Proper diagnosis will reveal the scale of injury and determine the best remedy.

Some cases can resolve with rest and rehabilitation. Others require medication, physical therapy, or surgery to remove the damaged parts. Diagnosis involves reviewing your medical history and symptom patterns.

The physician will also conduct a physical examination and may use X-ray scans or request an MRI to assess damage to bones, cartilage, and menisci. After diagnosis, the knee doctor will determine whether you need non-surgical or surgical treatment.

Working With an Orthopedic Knee Surgeon

The first assessment will determine if knee surgery is essential. If such is the recommendation, you should immediately seek an experienced orthopedic knee surgeon. There are various types of surgeries used to treat ACL tears.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm