Archive for category: Knee Surgery

Options for Treating Arthritis in the Knee

Article featured on The Noyes Knee Institute

Knee osteoarthritis can occur when the cartilage around the knee wears down. Without the protection of cartilage, bones in the joint grind together, causing inflammation and pain. In severe cases, a knee surgeon might recommend knee replacement or arthroscopic surgery. Fortunately, many non-invasive options help relieve the pain of arthritis in the knee.

Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: What’s the Difference?

Knee osteoarthritis is a progressive condition in which the subchondral bone suffers damage as the cartilage slowly wears away. This type of arthritis is common in middle-aged and elderly patients and happens more frequently in females than males.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disorder of the autoimmune system which leads to chronic inflammation. RA usually presents in both knees at the same time. Other joints, including fingers, toes, ankles, and wrists may also be affected.

Both types of arthritis respond to the conservative treatments listed below. However, as an auto-immune disorder, RA also requires specific medical care.

Treatments for Arthritis in the Knees

Weight Loss

For every pound of weight lost, you relieve four to six pounds of pressure from the knee. Carrying a significant amount of extra weight puts extra strain on knee joints which aggravates arthritis symptoms. However, even if you are not obese, losing just five to ten pounds could significantly relieve arthritis pain.

Avoid Aggravating Activities

While it’s important to continue exercising and moving your knees, overdoing it can make problems worse. Avoid the following activities if you notice pain or swelling up to 24 hours after participation:

  • High-impact exercise/sports
  • Kneeling/squatting
  • Walking for periods longer than 60-90 minutes without a rest break
  • Using stairs (inclining or declining)
  • Sitting in one position for more than 30 minutes without a break (such as during a long drive)
  • Standing for periods longer than 30-60 minutes

It may not be practical to avoid all of these activities every day, but reducing them as much as possible should help alleviate arthritis knee pain.

Anti-Inflammatory Medications

NSAIDs can be extremely helpful in easing arthritis pain. However, it’s important to use prescription or over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications only as recommended by your physician. Overuse can cause serious side effects.

Knee Injections

Steroid or synthetic lubricant injections such as Synvisc may be recommended when diet and other lifestyle changes are ineffective.

Physical Therapy

Physical therapy and “knee-friendly” exercises are often recommended to help regain strength and flexibility in the knee joint.

Knee Surgery

When conservative methods fail, it may be time to consider knee surgery. Many people automatically think of total knee replacement when they think of surgery for treating knee arthritis, but there are several other surgical options to consider:

  • Arthroscopic debridement, abrasion arthroplasty
  • Autologous chondrocyte implantation
  • Femoral osteotomy
  • High tibial osteotomy
  • Meniscus transplantation
  • Osteochondral autograft transfer
  • Partial knee replacement

You and your knee surgeon will determine the surgical option that’s best for your situation. If you have sustained additional knee injuries, other procedures may be performed simultaneously as surgery to correct arthritis.

Should I see a Knee Surgeon?

If you have tried conservative therapies, but your arthritis pain continues to get worse, it may be time to consider surgery.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

What Happens After ACL Surgery

Article featured on UCSF Health

See our recommendations for helping your knee recover (and when to call the doctor) after surgery. Find out what to expect from your rehab program, when you’re likely to start walking, and when it’s safe to start swimming and running.

Recovery from ACL Surgery

After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery, move your ankles up and down an average of 10 times every 10 minutes. Continue this exercise for two to three days to help blood circulation and to prevent blood clots from forming in your legs. If you develop acute pain in the back of your calf, tell your doctor. This could be an early sign of clots.

Elevate leg

Keep your operated leg elevated at a minimum of a 45-degree angle. Prop your leg on cushions or pillows so your knee is at least 12 inches above your heart for the first three to five days after surgery. Keep your leg elevated if your knee swells or throbs when you are up and about on crutches. Don’t put pillows behind your knee because this limits motion of the knee. Place pillows under your heel and calf.

Take pain medication

Expected pain and discomfort for the first few days. Take pain medications as your doctor advises. These could be over-the-counter painkillers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, or stronger narcotic drugs.

Bend knee

Slowly begin bending your knee. Straighten your leg and bend your knee. If necessary, place your hands behind your knee for assistance bending your knee. The goal is to achieve a range of motion of 0 to 90 degrees by the time you return for your first post-operative visit a week after surgery.

Monitor for fever

A low-grade fever – up to 101 degrees Fahrenheit or 38.3 Celsius – is common for four or five days after surgery. If your temperature is higher or lasts longer, tell your doctor. Your temperature should go down with acetaminophen.

Remove bandage

The dressing on your knee is usually removed the day after surgery. There may be some minor fluid drainage for two days. Sterile dressings or bandages may be used during this time. After surgery, keep the wound clean and dry. Take sponge baths until the sutures are removed.

Rehabilitation

Your rehabilitation program to restore range of motion to your knee begins the moment you wake up in the recovery room. During the first week after surgery, most patients are encouraged to lift their legs without assistance while lying on their backs. These are called straight leg raises. By the end of the second or third week, patients usually walk without crutches.

Sessions with a physical therapist usually begin seven to 14 days after surgery. During physical therapy, weight bearing is allowed if you did not have a meniscus repair.

A range of motion of 0 to 140 degrees is a good goal for the first two months.

Don’t work your quadriceps early on because this can stretch the ACL graft. Stationery bike riding or lightweight leg presses are recommended during the first three months after surgery. These exercises strengthen the quadriceps while using the hamstrings to protect the ACL graft.

Don’t swim or run for five months. You can swim with your arms, without paddling your feet, at about two to three months after surgery.


The Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Center of Oregon is an award-winning, board-certified orthopedic group located in downtown Portland Oregon. We utilize both surgical and nonsurgical means to treat musculoskeletal trauma, spine diseases, sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

Our mission is to return our patients back to pain-free mobility and full strength as quickly and painlessly as possible using both surgical and non-surgical orthopedic procedures.

Our expert physicians provide leading-edge, comprehensive care in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic conditions, including total joint replacement and sports medicine. We apply the latest state-of-the-art techniques in order to return our patients to their active lifestyle.

If you’re looking for compassionate, expert orthopedic surgeons in Portland Oregon, contact OSM today.

Phone:
503-224-8399

Address
1515 NW 18th Ave, 3rd Floor
Portland, OR 97209

Hours
Monday–Friday
8:00am – 4:30pm

3 Trends That Are Disrupting the Total Knee Replacement Market in 2020

By Amanda Pedersen | Jan 16, 2020 MDDI (Source)

Big changes lie ahead for knee replacements in 2020 and beyond. MD+DI recently spoke with an expert at DePuy Synthes for insight into how three key trends are impacting the market.

In recent years MD+DI has reported on a number of ways emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), surgical robotics, and 3D-printing are impacting a number of different sectors in medtech. In 2020, we expect these technologies to become even more relevant in the industry, particularly in orthopaedics.
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Answers to Common Questions About Knee Replacement Surgery

Article Featured on WebMD

Who Needs Knee Replacement Surgery?

You and your doctor may consider knee replacement surgery if you have a stiff, painful knee that makes it difficult to perform even the simplest of activities, and other treatments are no longer working. Historically, this surgery has generally been reserved for people over age 50 who have severe osteoarthritis but with advances in technology, adults are more frequently opting for earlier surgeries to optimize their quality of life.

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The Best Time of Year to Have Knee Replacement Surgery

Featured on mykneereplacementrecovery.com

You may be wondering when is the best time of year to have knee replacement surgery. Many patients ask this question when considering TKR and the consensus is that the spring and early fall are the best seasons. Read more

How to tell if you have Bursitis in your Knee

Article Featured on Medicine.net

Find out about knee bursitis, inflammation of one of the three fluid-filled sacs (bursae) due to injury or strain. Symptoms include pain, swelling, warmth, tenderness, and redness. Read about treatment, causes, and home remedies.

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Did I Tear my Meniscus? Symptoms of a Torn Meniscus

Article Featured on Brigham Health

What is a torn meniscus?

There are 3 bones in the knee. These are the femur, tibia, and patella. The ends of those bones are covered with cartilage. This is a smooth material that cushions the bone and allows the joint to move easily without pain. The cartilage acts as a shock absorber. Between the bones of the knees are 2 crescent-shaped disks of connective tissue, called menisci. These also act as shock absorbers to cushion the lower part of the leg from the weight of the rest of the body.

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6 Reasons to See a Doctor for Knee Pain

Article Featured on Active Implants

The truth is, nearly everyone’s knees will give them some sort of trouble eventually, and most athletes will experience some knee pain from time to time. So when knee pain occurs, it can be difficult to know whether the problem will resolve itself. Here are 6 warning signs that may indicate a more serious knee injury and warrant a trip to the doctor.

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6 Do’s and Don’ts After Knee Surgery

Article Featured on Active Implants

After knee surgery, there is no doubt you will encounter challenges and pain on the path to recovery. While it will seem difficult, and maybe even impossible at times, try to remember that what happens after your surgery is just as essential to the overall success of the procedure as the surgery itself.

Here are some do’s and don’ts to help you along the road to recovery:

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Meniscal Transplant Surgery

The meniscus is a C-shaped cushion of cartilage in the knee joint. When people talk about torn cartilage in the knee, they are usually referring to torn meniscus. If a meniscus is so badly damaged it cannot be repaired, it may need to be removed or trimmed out. Without the meniscus cushion, persistent knee pain and arthritis can develop.

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